Do you dare to read without limits?
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Communications for Volunteers - cover

Communications for Volunteers

Louise Merrington

Publisher: PAC Books

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

What makes an engaging website? How many social networks do you really need to be on? Are flyers and posters a thing of the past? And why do you even need to market your organisation in the first place? 
With Communications for Volunteers, you’ll discover the answers to these questions and more. Dr Louise Merrington draws on her experience as a communications consultant, journalist, author and facilitator to provide simple, low-cost ways for community groups to improve their communications without burning out their volunteers. In this book you’ll find:A step-by-step guide to developing a communications strategyAn introduction to design and multimedia – websites, photography, graphics and moreEasy tips for improving your writing and media skillsA breakdown of all the major social media platforms, their advantages and disadvantagesAn overview of email lists and other useful tools such as surveys, petitions and crowdfundingAdvice on when to hire a professional 
Filled with real-life case studies from community groups, comprehensive templates and flowcharts, and practical hands-on guidance, Communications for Volunteers gives you the skills you need to approach communications and marketing with confidence.

Other books that might interest you

  • The Infinite Desire for Growth - cover

    The Infinite Desire for Growth

    Daniel Cohen

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Why society’s expectation of economic growth is no longer realistic 
    Economic growth--and the hope of better things to come—is the religion of the modern world. Yet its prospects have become bleak, with crashes following booms in an endless cycle. In the United States, eighty percent of the population has seen no increase in purchasing power over the last thirty years and the situation is not much better elsewhere. The Infinite Desire for Growth spotlights the obsession with wanting more, and the global tensions that have arisen as a result. Amid finite resources, increasing populations, environmental degradation, and political unrest, the quest for new social and individual goals has never been so critical. 
    Leading economist Daniel Cohen provides a whirlwind tour of the history of economic growth, from the early days of civilization to modern times, underscoring what is so unsettling today. The new digital economy is establishing a "zero-cost" production model, inexpensive software is taking over basic tasks, and years of exploiting the natural world have begun to backfire with deadly consequences. Working hard no longer guarantees social inclusion or income. Drawing on economics, anthropology, and psychology, and thinkers ranging from Rousseau to Keynes and Easterlin, Cohen examines how a future less dependent on material gain might be considered and, how, in a culture of competition, individual desires might be better attuned to the greater needs of society. 
    At a time when wanting what we haven't got has become an obsession, The Infinite Desire for Growth explores the ways we might reinvent, for the twenty-first century, the old ideal of social progress.
    Show book
  • The Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham Volume 5 - January 1794 to December 1797 - cover

    The Correspondence of Jeremy...

    Jeremy Bentham

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The first five volumes of the Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham contain over 1,300 letters written both to and from Bentham over a 50-year period, beginning in 1752 (aged three) with his earliest surviving letter to his grandmother, and ending in 1797 with correspondence concerning his attempts to set up a national scheme for the provision of poor relief. Against the background of the debates on the American Revolution of 1776 and the French Revolution of 1789, to which he made significant contributions, Bentham worked first on producing a complete penal code, which involved him in detailed explorations of fundamental legal ideas, and then on his panopticon prison scheme. Despite developing a host of original and ground-breaking ideas, contained in a mass of manuscripts, he published little during these years, and remained, at the close of this period, a relatively obscure individual. Nevertheless, these volumes reveal how the foundations were laid for the remarkable rise of Benthamite utilitarianism in the early nineteenth century. 
     
    Bentham’s life in the mid-1790s was dominated by the panopticon, both as a prison and as a network of workhouses for the indigent. The letters in this volume document in excruciating detail Bentham’s attempt to build a panopticon prison in London, and the opposition he faced from local aristocratic landowners. His brother Samuel was appointed as Inspector-General of Naval Works and in September 1796 married Mary Sophia Fordyce. 
    Praise for the Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham, volumes 1-5 
    ‘These volumes provide significant additions to our understanding of Bentham’s work in the first half of his life up to 1797. The insights they offer into Bentham’s activities, ideas and method cast light on his philosophical and political positions in a seminal period in British and European history.’British Journal for the History of Philosophy
    Show book
  • Zoned in the USA - The Origins and Implications of American Land-Use Regulation - cover

    Zoned in the USA - The Origins...

    Sonia A. Hirt

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    Why are American cities, suburbs, and towns so distinct? Compared to European cities, those in the United States are characterized by lower densities and greater distances; neat, geometric layouts; an abundance of green space; a greater level of social segregation reflected in space; and—perhaps most noticeably—a greater share of individual, single-family detached housing. In Zoned in the USA, Sonia A. Hirt argues that zoning laws are among the important but understudied reasons for the cross-continental differences.Hirt shows that rather than being imported from Europe, U.S. municipal zoning law was in fact an institution that quickly developed its own, distinctly American profile. A distinct spatial culture of individualism—founded on an ideal of separate, single-family residences apart from the dirt and turmoil of industrial and agricultural production—has driven much of municipal regulation, defined land-use, and, ultimately, shaped American life. Hirt explores municipal zoning from a comparative and international perspective, drawing on archival resources and contemporary land-use laws from England, Germany, France, Australia, Russia, Canada, and Japan to challenge assumptions about American cities and the laws that guide them.
    Show book
  • The Crime of Chernobyl - The Nuclear Goulag - cover

    The Crime of Chernobyl - The...

    Wladimir Tchertkoff

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Hundreds of books, long and short, have been written about the Chernobyl tragedy. Few people are left indifferent once they understand a little about the biggest technological catastrophe in history. Wladimir Tchertkoff’s book “The Crime of Chernobyl - the Nuclear Gulag” occupies a central place in this library aboutChernobyl. 
     
    Many journalists, like Wladimir Tchertkoff, a documentary film maker for Swiss television”, were shocked by what they saw in the areas affected by the radioactive emissions following the explosion at Reactor 4 of the Lenin nuclear power plant in Chernobyl (Ukraine). Many witnesses, like Tchertkoff, were revolted by the events that followed in the scientific and political world after the Catastrophe. But very few were able to gather together all the facts to back up these feelings of indignation in a formidable work of documentation.
     
    Tchertkoff’s book does not limit itself to remembering the events. It demands of each of us that we grasp the fact that following the Chernobyl catastrophe, the damage to human health and to the natural environment will be felt for hundreds of years over immense areas of the northern hemisphere contaminated by strontium-90 and caesium-137, and for tens of thousands of years by plutonium in a number of areas of Ukraine, Belarus and Russia. 
     
    Tchertkoff’s book is reminiscent of Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s famous book “The Gulag Archipelago”, not simply in its title but in the method used to select and reveal the facts: it is a documentary (supplying names, titles and dates), it is encyclopaedic (the destinies and actions of individuals are accompanied by medical, historical, physical, biological, legal and political documentation) and it is passionate (the author is not a foreign observer but an active participant in events).
     
    The bringing together of all this information,  combined with the author’s obvious talent as a writer, makes the publication of Wladimir Tchertkoff’s book an important event for thousands and thousands of people in different countries. For those living in the contaminated territories, or those who have been exposed in any way to dangerous levels of artificial radionuclides, this book will help them towards a better understanding of how to deal with the dangers posed by radiation to themselves and to those closest to them. For those who are trying, in spite of the reaction to the consequences of Chernobyl from governments and international organisations, which was muted, to say the least, to understand more fully and to reduce to a minimum the uncontrolled effects of “Atoms for Peace” – the chronic exposure to low level ionising radiation, the effects of artificial radiation on health - this book will provide great moral support.
     
    This is an important book for the history of contemporary society: it documents the way in which, during the last quarter of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century, political statements diverged, sometimes diametrically, from the real action taken. The corporate interests of the nuclear industry and short-term "political expediency" took precedence over safety considerations and over the lives of millions of people. Finally, the book contains many striking descriptions of human behaviour: cowardice and heroism, baseness and self-sacrifice, selflessness and villainy, a sense of duty and irresponsibility.
     
    This book is a revised and fuller version of the 2006 French edition. It is based on documents from the hundreds of hours of film footage used in the seven documentary films made about the Chernobyl catastrophe by the inseparable team, Wladimir Tchertkoff - Emanuela Andreoli.
     
    When the first French edition of this book came out, it led to the establishment of the international organisation, IndependentWHO, and to demonstrations being held on a daily (!) basis in Geneva, calling on the World Health Organisation to tell the truth about the consequences of Chernobyl, and about Fukushima too (the WHO refuses to do so, bound as it is by the agreement it signed with the International Atomic Energy Agency in 1959).
    Show book
  • The Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham Volume 3 - January 1781 to October 1788 - cover

    The Correspondence of Jeremy...

    Jeremy Bentham

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The first five volumes of the Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham contain over 1,300 letters written both to and from Bentham over a 50-year period, beginning in 1752 (aged three) with his earliest surviving letter to his grandmother, and ending in 1797 with correspondence concerning his attempts to set up a national scheme for the provision of poor relief. Against the background of the debates on the American Revolution of 1776 and the French Revolution of 1789, to which he made significant contributions, Bentham worked first on producing a complete penal code, which involved him in detailed explorations of fundamental legal ideas, and then on his panopticon prison scheme. Despite developing a host of original and ground-breaking ideas, contained in a mass of manuscripts, he published little during these years, and remained, at the close of this period, a relatively obscure individual. Nevertheless, these volumes reveal how the foundations were laid for the remarkable rise of Benthamite utilitarianism in the early nineteenth century. 
     The letters in this volume document Bentham’s meeting and friendship with the Earl of Shelburne (later the Marquis of Lansdowne), which opened a whole new set of opportunities for him, as well as his extraordinary journey, by way of the Mediterranean, to visit his brother Samuel in Russia. 
    Praise for the Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham, volumes 1-5 
    ‘These volumes provide significant additions to our understanding of Bentham’s work in the first half of his life up to 1797. The insights they offer into Bentham’s activities, ideas and method cast light on his philosophical and political positions in a seminal period in British and European history.’British Journal for the History of Philosophy
    Show book
  • The Battle Begins - The Story of Creation - cover

    The Battle Begins - The Story of...

    Caleb Seeling

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Even as God walked through the beauty of His new creation, and breathed life into Adam, His masterpiece ... a warrior-angel gives into his pride—and commits the ultimate betrayal. Witness Adam and Eve falling into Lucifer's trap, as the battle for eternity begins in this brilliantly presented retelling of Creation, the Fall, and God's promise of redemption.  
    Show book