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SPUD 19: A Vietnam Aviator's Battles with PTSD - cover

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SPUD 19: A Vietnam Aviator's Battles with PTSD

George Davis

Publisher: War Writers' Campaign, Inc.

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Summary

This is the life story of Major George P. Davis III, U.S. Army (Retired) and his battle with PTSD, from the time he was in Vietnam until today. Raised in rural West Virginia, he rose through the ranks eventually becoming part of an elite group of Army aviators flying an OV-1 Mohawk for several years. The Mohawk’s mission was unarmed reconnaissance and surveillance of enemy movement, with most being flown over enemy territory known as “Indian Country.”  
After several years, he lost the ability to be able to fly as his PTSD kept getting worse and worse. It really hit home after he retired and it has been a full-blown battle ever since, even up until today. His internal battles changed his life and only recently has he been able to begin to cope with them. Agent Orange has also wrecked havoc on his body and added to his psychological issues. This is his story.

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