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Ministry of Moral Panic - cover

Ministry of Moral Panic

Amanda Lee Koe

Publisher: Epigram Books

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Summary

Winner of Best Fiction Title for Singapore Book Awards 2016 
 
Winner of the Singapore Literature Prize for Fiction 2014 
 
Longlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award 2014 
 
Selected by The Business Times as one of the Top 10 English Singapore books from 1965–2015 
 
 
Meet an over-the-hill Pop Yé-yé singer with a faulty heart, two conservative middle-aged women holding hands in the Galápagos, and the proprietor of a Laundromat with a penchant for Cantonese songs of heartbreak. Rehash national icons: the truth about racial riot fodder-girl Maria Hertogh living out her days as a chambermaid in Lake Tahoe, a mirage of the Merlion as a ladyboy working Orchard Towers, and a high-stakes fantasy starring the still-suave lead of the 1990s TV hit serial The Unbeatables. 
 
Heartfelt and sexy, the stories of Amanda Lee Koe encompass a skewed world fraught with prestige anxiety, moral relativism, sexual frankness, and the improbable necessity of human connection. Told in strikingly original prose, these are fictions that plough, relentlessly, the possibilities of understanding Singapore and her denizens discursively, off-centre. Ministry of Moral Panic is an extraordinary debut collection and the introduction of a revelatory new voice.

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