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Mud Ball - The Mud Series - cover

Mud Ball - The Mud Series

Atulya K Bingham

Publisher: Atulya K Bingham

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Summary

"If you've ever fantasised about going off-grid, this book is a must read!" The Fethiye Times. 
 
I couldn’t teach another lesson. Nor could I tolerate another day with a boss, a punch card and the indigestion I suffered from bolting my muesli. This was why I’d spent the past five months camping in a remote Turkish field. I’d been happy despite the lack of power or running water. Then the first winter storm crashed through the valley, turning my tent into a canvas pole dancer. It dawned on me I might need a house. There were only two problems: I had just $6000 left in my account, and 6 weeks before winter. 
 
"A wonderful, heart-tugging story." The Natural Building Blog. 
"Inspiring and beautifully written." The Owner Builder Magazine.

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