Don't look for limitations, there are none.
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
The Great Warrior Genghis Khan - cover

We are sorry! The publisher (or author) gave us the instruction to take down this book from our catalog. But please don't worry, you still have more than 1 million other books to choose from, so you can read without limits!

The Great Warrior Genghis Khan

Wang Chisheng

Publisher: Asiapac Books Pte Ltd

  • 0
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

This comic version of Genghis Khan charts his rise from an angst-ridden youth trying to rebuild his clan to become a fearsome warrior fighting back to regain what he had lost and more. This is the tale of one man who laid claim on the whole of Mongolia and created a mammoth empire stretching across Asia and Europe; a man whose name invoked fear in rulers everywhere. Genghis Khan, through his great vision, courage and determination, overcame all odds to make history by almost conquering the whole world.

Other books that might interest you

  • The Great Islamic Conquests AD 632–750 - cover

    The Great Islamic Conquests AD...

    David Nicolle

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Few centuries in world history have had such a profound and long-lasting impact as the first hundred years of Islamic history. In this book, David Nicolle examines the extensive Islamic conquests between AD 632 and 750. These years saw the religion and culture of Islam erupt from the Arabian Peninsula and spread across an area far larger than that of the Roman Empire. The effects of this rapid expansion were to shape European affairs for centuries to come. This book examines the social and military history of the period, describing how and why the Islamic expansion was so successful.
    Show book
  • The CBS Murders - A True Account of Greed and Violence in New York's Diamond District - cover

    The CBS Murders - A True Account...

    Richard Hammer

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Winner of the Edgar Award: The gripping account of a gruesome mass murder in gritty 1980s New York and the relentless hunt for a coldblooded killer.   On a warm spring evening in 1982, thirty-seven-year-old accountant Margaret Barbera left work in New York City and walked to the West Side parking lot where she kept her BMW. Finding the lock on the driver’s side door jammed, she went to the passenger’s side and inserted her key. A man leaned through the open window of a van parked in the next spot, pressed a silenced pistol to the back of Margaret’s head, and fired. She was dead before she hit the pavement.   It was a professional hit, meticulously planned—but the killer didn’t expect three employees of the nearby CBS television studios to stumble onto the scene of the crime. “You didn’t see nothin’, did you?” he demanded, before shooting the first eyewitness in the head. After chasing down and executing the other two men, the murderer sped out of the parking lot with Margaret’s lifeless body in the back of his van.   Thirty minutes later, the first detectives arrived on the scene. Veterans of Midtown North, a sprawling precinct stretching from the exclusive shops of Fifth Avenue to the flophouses of Hell’s Kitchen, they thought they’d seen it all. But a bloodbath in the heart of Manhattan was a shocking new level of depravity, and the investigation would unfold under intense media coverage. Setting out on the trail of an assassin, the NYPD uncovered one of the most diabolical criminal conspiracies in the city’s history.   Richard Hammer’s blow-by-blow account of “the CBS Murders” is a thrilling tale of greed, violence, and betrayal, and a fascinating portrait of how a big-city police department solved the toughest of cases.  
    Show book
  • In Their Own Words 2 - More letters from history - cover

    In Their Own Words 2 - More...

    Archives The National

    • 1
    • 5
    • 0
    Letters, postcards, notes and telegraphs from the great and the good, the notorious and the downright wicked, shine a spotlight on a range of historical events and movements providing an immediate link to the immediate and much more distant past. 
      
    The book includes letters from: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Mikhail Gorbachev, Lucien Freud, Barbara Hepworth, Nelson Mandela, Caitlin Thomas, Mary Whitehouse, Gandhi, George Washington among many others. Subjects covered include suffragette disturbances, obscene publications, relations between international leaders, child emigration including the Kindertransport. 
      
    The book features 55 letters, each with a 600-word essay, and a 3000 word introduction. There are 150 images in the book: 55 of the letters themselves, and a further 95 supplementary images.
    Show book
  • Hunting Monsters - Cryptozoology and the Reality Behind the Myths - cover

    Hunting Monsters - Cryptozoology...

    Darren Naish

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    The Loch Ness Monster, bigfoot and the yeti have long held a fascination for people the world over. Debates about their actual existence or what they might really be have continued for decades, if not centuries. Known also as cryptids, they have spawned a body of research known as cryptozoology. This entertaining book looks at the evidence of these mysterious monsters and others and explores what they might really be (if they exist at all), why they have been represented as they have and the development of cryptozoology and how it has collected data to discover more about these unknown creatures.
    Show book
  • Deadly Obsessions - Three True Crime Sagas - cover

    Deadly Obsessions - Three True...

    Joan Barthel

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Three true crime classics of love, murder, and the mob by a Pulitzer Prize finalist who writes with “honest and gritty realism” (Phoenix Gazette).  Award-winning author Joan Barthel uncovers the dark secrets behind some of the strangest cases in the history of American crime in these three captivating works of “first-class journalism” (The New York Times).  A Death in California: When twice-divorced Beverly Hills socialite Hope Masters fell in love with a handsome advertising executive, she thought her life was finally turning around—until she woke up to find a gun in her mouth and her fiancé dead in the next room. The killer was a new acquaintance who’d been visiting the couple’s Sierra Nevada ranch. Even more bizarre, however, was what happened at the end of the long, nightmarish weekend in which Masters saw everything she cared about destroyed: She began to fall in love with her tormenter. “Superbly documented, brilliantly written. The suspense will keep readers caught to the very last page” (Ann Rule, bestselling author of The Stranger Beside Me).  A Death in Canaan: When eighteen-year-old Peter Reilly arrived home from the Teen Center one night to discover his mother lying naked on the bedroom floor with her throat slashed, local police made him their prime suspect. After eight hours of interrogation and a polygraph test, Reilly confessed. But the townspeople of Canaan, Connecticut, couldn’t believe the naïve teenager was capable of such a gruesome crime. With the help of some celebrities, including Mike Nichols and William Styron, the community rallied to the boy’s defense. Barthel’s “riveting” account of this fascinating and frightening case was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize (People).  Love or Honor: Police officer Chris Anastos was happily married and satisfied with his work on the NYPD’s anti-crime unit—until he was asked to go undercover to investigate links between the Italian mob and a Greek criminal network in Queens. For five years he moved back and forth between his comfortable home life and a murky, underground world of wise guys, pimps, and thieves. But when he fell in love with the beautiful, raven-haired daughter of a Long Island capo, Anastos faced his gravest threat yet. “For devotees of cop tales and mob lore . . . Tantalizing” (The New York Times Book Review).  
    Show book
  • Life Less Lonely A: What We Can All Do to Lead More Connected Kinder Lives - cover

    Life Less Lonely A: What We Can...

    Nick Duerden

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Loneliness has reached the levels of an epidemic. From the bullied child to the new parent, from the pensioner who has outlived friends and family members to teenagers who manage their social lives through the glow of a mobile phone, it can - and does - affect anyone and everyone, irrespective of age, race or class. Many suffer in silence, convinced it's a confession too far, a sign of too much vulnerability, a shameful failing. But the human condition is not a failing. 
     
    What's it like when loneliness descends? How does it announce itself, and how do you recognise it? Do you discuss it, or conceal it? From where can you seek help? 
     
    A Life Less Lonely shares stories of loneliness and social isolation, and looks for ways in which we can help one another to future-proof ourselves against this most insidious affliction. By talking to those who suffer from it, and by highlighting the work of those who fight to combat it, the book offers guidance on how to spot the symptoms in yourself and in others, how to connect with those around you, and how, by understanding it all better, we might just set ourselves free from it. 
     
    In this way, what is an epidemic today might not be one tomorrow.
    Show book