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A Dream of Red Mansions - cover

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A Dream of Red Mansions

Cao Xueqin

Publisher: Asiapac Books Pte Ltd

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Summary

One of the Four Main Classical Novels of China, A Dream of Red Mansions is the only novel to address the role of women in China's history. This tragic romance is brought to life with the delicate penstrokes of local artist Seraphina Lum, in her debut graphic novel.

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