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The People Want Dance Pop - In tune #2 - cover

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The People Want Dance Pop - In tune #2

Luna Harlow

Publisher: Luna Harlow

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Summary

TWO FRIENDS DECIDE TO START A BAND AND YOU WON'T BELIEVE WHAT HAPPENS NEXT! 
In 2011 Wesley and Uri formed a band, dragged in two of their best friends, and set out to see the world together on the adventure of a lifetime. Along the way they discover the wondrous effects of ill-advised drug use and poor sexual choices. By 2016 they've gone their separate ways and Wesley can only look back. Is it Wesley's drinking that comes between them? Is it the arrival of beautiful, normal Gloria and the promise of a life outside the band? Or is it the mysteries Uri clings to that threaten everything they've built between them? 
This is a story of the journey between those two points, between hopeful youth and bitter-sweet experience, and all the mistakes people make along the way.

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