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Date Runner: Calculate Your Best Match - cover

Date Runner: Calculate Your Best Match

Y- Photography

Publisher: Y-Photography

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This handbook will teach you how to calculate your real dating chances with any partner of the opposite sex. You will probably be surprised to learn that almost every intimate relationship outcome could be predicted by mathematical formulas based on a genders unique preferences and behavioral patterns. As the accuracy reaches 99 percent, this book could be your ultimate guide and precise dating assistant.

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