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The Adventures of Holden Heng - cover

The Adventures of Holden Heng

Robert Yeo

Publisher: Epigram Books

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Summary

Enter the world of Holden Heng, the not-so-lucky-in-love protagonist of this comic realist novel that documents social currents transforming the Lion City. Described as the most Singaporean of Singapore writers, Robert Yeo presents an immensely entertaining story of a typical Singaporean man’s escapades with three very different women. Will he ever find true love?

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