Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Spinner ae25b23ec1304e55286f349b58b08b50e88aad5748913a7eb729246ffefa31c9
Unfolding Life: A Book of Haiku - cover

Unfolding Life: A Book of Haiku

Terri Deno

Publisher: Terri Deno

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

The ancient art of the Japanese haiku has been embraced by the world for centuries. Today's modern take on the traditional form can make a reader think, feel, and see the things in this world that are sometimes hard to describe-even more difficult if it's limited to just seventeen syllables. 
 
Unfolding Life is the debut haiku collection from Terri Deno. From nature and the tangible to time and the intangible, a wide variety of topics are explored in this ancient verse. This collection also include artwork from KR Smith.

Who read this book also read:

  • May Sarton - A Self-Portrait - cover

    May Sarton - A Self-Portrait

    May Sarton

    • 1
    • 3
    • 0
    This transcript from the film World of Light: A Portrait of May Sarton illuminates the life and writing of the poet while celebrating the joys of creativity, love, and solitude In June of 1979, May Sarton answered the questions of two filmmakers and read to them from her poetry. This four-day “jam session” ultimately became an acclaimed documentary about her life and work.   For Sarton, the muse has always been female, and the writer says that her own poems “tell me where to go.” In this rare and inspiring window into a singular woman’s soul, Sarton speaks candidly about everything from how a single image opened the door to writing about her mother to the importance of transparency in art and life. She shares insights into her very personal art, including the unusual people and events that provide inspiration, how creativity can grow out of pain, solitude as a two-edged sword, the difficulties of being a female poet, and the ways love can open “the door into one’s own secret and . . . frightening real self.”   Featuring sections entitled “On Inner Space,” “On Nature,” and “On Love,” this revealing volume is also about the need go on, even when up against overwhelming odds. May Sarton: A Self-Portrait pays tribute to an artist’s vision and serves as a revealing window into a fascinating life.
    Show book
  • Yellow Face (TCG Edition) - cover

    Yellow Face (TCG Edition)

    David Henry Hwang

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    “A pungent play of ideas with a big heart. Yellow Face brings to the national discussion about race a sense of humor a mile wide, an even-handed treatment and a hopeful, healing vision of a world that could be.”—Variety 
    “Charming, touching, and cunningly organized as well as funny, [with] an Ibsenite reach and stature far beyond any issues of Hwang’s self-image.”—The Village Voice 
    “It’s about our country, about public image, about face,” says David Henry Hwang about his latest work, a mock documentary that puts Hwang himself center stage as it explores both Asian identity as well as race in America. The play begins with the 1990s controversy over color-blind casting for Miss Saigon, before it spins into a comic fantasy, in which the character DHH pens a play in protest and then unwittingly casts a white actor as the Asian lead. Yellow Face also explores the real-life investigation of Hwang’s father, the first Asian American to own a federally chartered bank, and the espionage charges against physicist Wen Ho Lee. Adroitly combining the light touch of comedy with weighty political and emotional issues, “Hwang’s lively and provocative cultural self-portrait lets nobody off the hook” (The New York Times). 
    David Henry Hwang is the author of the Tony Award–winning M. Butterfly, a finalist for the 1988 Pulitzer Prize. Other plays include Golden Child, FOB, The Dance and the Railroad, and Family Devotions; his opera libretti include three works for composer Philip Glass. He was appointed by President Clinton to the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities.
    Show book
  • Letters from Maine - Poems - cover

    Letters from Maine - Poems

    May Sarton

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    The poetic tale of a fleeting love affair In her sixty years in literature, May Sarton has taken her readers through all of her emotions and pushed us to explore new places within ourselves. But her feelings are never more raw or exposed than in Letters from Maine.   The rugged coast provides a stark background for Sarton’s images of a tragically brief and newfound love. She describes the willingness to give anything and devote everything to a new love, as well as the despair at the memory of what is left over. As Sarton grew older, time became an increasingly prominent factor in her life, but as Letters from Maine shows, it is never too late to love.
    Show book
  • The Garden of Janus - cover

    The Garden of Janus

    Aleister Crowley

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    This early work of poetry, by Aleister Crowley, was originally published in 1909. Born in Royal Leamington Spa, England in 1875, Crowley was raised by Christian fundamentalist parents. He attended Trinity College at Cambridge University, but left before graduating. After leaving the college, he devoted his time to studying the occult, and travelled extensively throughout the world in persuit of its secret knowledge. He went on to become a prolific writer, producing essays, prose and poetry on a wide range of subjects. To this day he remains a highly influential figure, both in occult circles and popular culture. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900's and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions.
    Show book
  • The Handmaid's Tale - cover

    The Handmaid's Tale

    Margaret Atwood

    • 6
    • 25
    • 1
    Margaret Atwood's popular dystopian novel The Handmaid's Tale explores a broad range of issues relating to power, gender and religious politics. Multiple Golden Globe award-winner Claire Danes (Romeo and Juliet, The Hours) gives a stirring performance of this classic in speculative fiction, one of the most powerful and widely read novels of our time. 
    After a staged terrorist attack kills the President and most of Congress, the government is deposed and taken over by the oppressive and all controlling Republic of Gilead. Offred, now a Handmaid serving in the household of the enigmatic Commander and his bitter wife, can remember a time when she lived with her husband and daughter and had a job, before she lost even her own name. Despite the danger, Offred learns to navigate the intimate secrets of those who control her every move, risking her life in breaking the rules in hopes of ending this oppression.
    Show book
  • The Court of the Profane - cover

    The Court of the Profane

    Aleister Crowley

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    This early work of poetry, by Aleister Crowley, was originally published in 1898. Born in Royal Leamington Spa, England in 1875, Crowley was raised by Christian fundamentalist parents. He attended Trinity College at Cambridge University, but left before graduating. After leaving the college, he devoted his time to studying the occult, and travelled extensively throughout the world in persuit of its secret knowledge. He went on to become a prolific writer, producing essays, prose and poetry on a wide range of subjects. To this day he remains a highly influential figure, both in occult circles and popular culture. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900's and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions.
    Show book