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Looking Back - Butter in the Well #4 - cover

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Looking Back - Butter in the Well #4

Linda K. Hubalek

Publisher: Butterfield Books Inc.

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Summary

The inevitable happens—time moves on and we grow older. Instead of our own little children surrounding us, grandchildren take their place. Each new generation lives in a new age of technology, not realizing the changes the generations before theirs has seen and improved for them. 
The cycle of life has changed the prairie also. The endless waves of tall native prairie grass have been reduced to uniform rows of grain crops. The curves of the river had shifted over the decades, eroded by both man and nature. The majestic prairie has been tamed over time. 
In this fourth book of the Butter in the well series, Kajsa Svensson Runeberg, now age seventy-five, looks back at the changes she has experiences on the farm she homesteaded fifty-one years ago. She reminisces about the past, resolves the present situation, and looks toward their future off the farm. 

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