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Heart Like A Starfish - cover

Heart Like A Starfish

Allen Callaci

Publisher: Pelekinesis

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Summary

Allen Callaci is a librarian, a rock and roll singer, and a heart transplant recipient. Heart Like A Starfish is the account of his death-defying heart transplant journey and the healing that follows, for both himself and those around him. With illustrations by the author and beautiful cover art by Amy Maloof, this wonderfully chaotic debut novel is told in a non-linear style that manages to convey the frenetic events and emotions while still embracing the strength and care and security all around. 
A portion of the proceeds of the book will be donated to Cedars-Sinai Heart Research Institute where the procedure was performed.

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