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Queen Bee: Reflections on Life and Other Rude Awakenings - cover

Queen Bee: Reflections on Life and Other Rude Awakenings

Catherine Sevenau

Publisher: Tintype Publishing

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Summary

Catherine Sevenau is an opener of doors,  an irreverent teller of tales, and the family scribe. Her first book, Passages from Behind These Doors, A Family Memoir, sets the pace for Queen Bee, Reflections on Life and Other Rude Awakenings. These 88 stories include posts from her blog, stories from her heart, and musings from her past. Join her on this roller coaster journey of reflections, as life,  with its continual barrage of rude awakenings, is always a ride!

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