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Tales of the Flying Tigers: Five Books about the American Volunteer Group Mercenary Heroes of Burma and China - cover

Tales of the Flying Tigers: Five Books about the American Volunteer Group Mercenary Heroes of Burma and China

Daniel Ford

Publisher: Warbird Books

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Summary

"What God abandoned, these defended / And saved the sum of things for pay."  
 
In the bleak winter of 1941-1942, no American or British force could stem the tide in Southeast Asia, as the Philippines, Thailand, Malaya, and Singapore fell to the victorious Japanese. Only in Burma was there a ray of hope. There, over beleaguered Rangoon, a few dozen Americans clawed Japanese warplanes from the sky for a cash bounty from the Chinese government. Wearing mismatched uniforms, with Chinese insignia, and flying cast-off fighter planes, they did what no other air force seemed able to do, and won immortality as the Flying Tigers. 
 
Daniel Ford wrote "the definitive history" of the American Volunteer Group, as it was formally known. Here, he has collected five e-books about the Flying Tigers into an omnibus that details the AVG's planes, pilots, and history as remembered in the United States and in Japan. An essential collection for every admirer of the Flying Tigers. 
 
"The AVG's first encounter with the Japanese Air Force over Kunming, China, on 20 December 1941 is often written about. The version Dan Ford presents here is probablythe most complete picture extant." (First Blood for the Flying Tigers) 
 
"I can wholeheartedly recommend his work to anyone desiring insight into the early years of the JAAF" (Rising Sun Over Burma) 
 
"Very well written and full of new information about a fascinating time in our history" (100 Hawks for China) 
 
"A unique insight into how the Japanese appeared to the pilots meeting them, and how the AVG learned to deal with them" (AVG Confidential)

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