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Strong Women: The Complete Trail of Thread Series - Trail of Thread - cover

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Strong Women: The Complete Trail of Thread Series - Trail of Thread

Linda K. Hubalek

Publisher: Butterfield Books Inc.

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Summary

Strong Women contains all three books in the Trail of Thread series. 
Trail of Thread: Taste the dust of the road and feel the wind in your face as you travel with a Kentucky family by wagon train to the new territory of Kansas in 1854. 
Find out what it was like for the thousands of families who made the cross-country journey into the unknown. This series is based on author Linda K. Hubalek's ancestors that traveled from Kentucky to Kansas in 1854. 
In the first book of the Trail of Thread series; in the form of letters she wrote on the journey, Deborah Pieratt describes the scenery, the everyday events on the trail, and the task of taking care of her family. Stories of humor and despair, along with her ongoing remarks about camping, cooking, and quilting on the wagon trail make you feel as if you pulled up stakes and are traveling with the Pieratt’s, too. 
Thimble of Soil: Follow the widowed Margaret Ralston Kennedy in this second book of the Trail of Thread series, as she travels with eight of her thirteen children from Ohio to the Territory of Kansas in 1855. 
A family from Ohio becomes involved on the free-state side against proslavery forces in Kansas before the Civil War. 
Experience the terror of the fighting and the determination to endure as you stake a claim alongside the women caught in the bloody conflicts of Kansas in the 1850's. 
Thousands of American headed west in the decade before the Civil War, but those who settled in Kansas suffered through frequent clashes between proslavery and free-state fractions that gripped the territory. 
Told through her letters, Thimble of Soil describes the prevalent hardships and infrequent joys experienced by the hardy pioneer women of Kansas, who struggled to protect their families from terrorist raids while building new homes and new lives on the vast unbroken prairie. 
Stitch of Courage: The third book in the Trail of Thread series, tells the story of the orphaned Maggie Kennedy, who followed her brothers to Kansas in the late 1850s. 
The niece of Margaret Ralston Kennedy, the main character in Hubalek's Thimble of Soil book, Maggie married the son of Deborah Pieratt, whose story was told in the Hubalek's Trail of Thread book. 
In letters to her sister in Ohio, Maggie describes how the women of Kansas faced the demons of the Civil War, fighting bravely to protect their homes and families while never knowing from one day to the next whether their men were alive or dead on the faraway battlefield. 
Feel the uncertainty, doubt, and danger faced by the pioneer women as they defend their homes and pray for their men during the Civil War. 
Twelve old quilt patterns are mentioned in the letters of each book, and the sketched designs are in the front of each book for reference.

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