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Butter in the Well - Butter in the Well #1 - cover

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Butter in the Well - Butter in the Well #1

Linda K. Hubalek

Publisher: Butterfield Books Inc.

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Summary

Swedish immigrant Kajsa Svensson Runeberg fights to survive and build a homestead on the Kansas prairie as she and her family faces the trials of weather, disease, accidents, and loneliness.  
This historical fiction, written in the form of diary entries dating 1868 to 1888, is based on the actual woman who homesteaded the author’s childhood home. True stories gathered on this Swedish family and community show the determination these pioneers had, to face and overcome the conflicts and tragedy that happened in their lives. 
“...could well be the most endearing ‘first settler’ account ever told. Once a reader starts the book, they are compelled to keep reading to see what will happen next on the isolated prairie homestead. Not to be missed!”—Capper’s Family Bookstore 
Hubalek has skillfully blended fiction and historic fact to recreate the life of Swedish homestead, Kajsa Svensson Runeberg. A story of emigrant dreams and pioneer struggles, it is an altogether rewarding story and one that deserves to be told.—Kansas State Historical Society

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