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My Little Valentine - cover

My Little Valentine

KelLee Parr

Publisher: KelLee Parr

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Summary

This is the true story of lost love between a mother and daughter. In 1925, a rural Kansas teenage girl found herself in the "family way" and unmarried. She was sent to The Willows Maternity Sanitarium, a home for unwed mothers, and gave up her baby to be raised by strangers. She was devastated but had to promise to never look for her baby. Though kept a secret, she never forgot and always hoped her baby girl was happy. Adopted and raised by a wonderful Kansas farm family, the daughter always wonders the who and why about her birth mother. After 66 years they are reunited and this is their story.

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