Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Spinner ae25b23ec1304e55286f349b58b08b50e88aad5748913a7eb729246ffefa31c9
Trail of Thread - Trail of Thread #1 - cover

Trail of Thread - Trail of Thread #1

Linda K. Hubalek

Publisher: Butterfield Books Inc.

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Taste the dust of the road and feel the wind in your face as you travel with a Kentucky family by wagon train to the new territory of Kansas in 1854.  
Find out what it was like for the thousands of families who made the cross-country journey into the unknown.  
In this first book of the Trail of Thread series; in the form of letters she wrote on the journey, Deborah Pieratt describes the scenery, the everyday events on the trail, and the task of taking care of her family. Stories of humor and despair, along with her ongoing remarks about camping, cooking, and quilting on the wagon trail make you feel as if you pulled up stakes and are traveling with the Pieratt’s, too.  
But hints of the brewing trouble ahead plagued them along the way as people questions their motive for settling in the new territory. If they are from the South, why don’t they have slaves with them? Would the Pieratt’s vote for or against legal slavery in the new state? Though Deborah does not realize it, her letters show how this trip affected her family for generations to come.  
This historical fiction series is based on author Linda K. Hubalek's ancestors who traveled from Kentucky to Kansas in 1854. Twelve old quilt patterns are mentioned in the letters, and the sketched designs are in the back of the book for reference.

Who read this book also read:

  • The Hummingbird Effect - Going 65 MPH 25y7 - cover

    The Hummingbird Effect - Going...

    Mitzi MacBain

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Mitzi MacBain was diagnosed with Adult ADHD-Hyperactive/Impulsive Type at age 49.  All of her adult life she was plagued with issues that she assumed were connected to her childhood.  
    
    She had chronic issues of overeating, overspending, ruminating about her childhood, lashing out at people, cycles of rage, constant need to keep moving, chronic sleep deprivation, no ability to plan for the future, and always acting on impulse.  She was plagued with chronic fear and anxiety at her core.  No matter how hard she worked on herself in therapy, 12 step programs, EMDR, hypnotherapy, acupuncture, etc., she just felt stuck.  
    
    This book is a testimony to the power of healing with the right tools and a lot of determination!
    Show book
  • What the Dead Have Taught Me About Living Well - cover

    What the Dead Have Taught Me...

    Samantha Rose, Rebecca Rosen

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    How can we know if our departed loved ones are still with us? Can guidance from beyond help our daily lives run more smoothly and feel more purposeful? Spiritual medium and bestselling author Rebecca Rosen has answers.
     
    After serving as a spiritual medium for more than two decades, Rosen knows with absolute clarity that the spirit world is always trying to get our attention. Our departed loved ones and spirit guides intervene in our lives daily to let us know that our real-life struggles have a rhyme, a reason, and a purpose and that we're not alone to figure it all out.
     
    Rosen knows how easy it is to get caught up in the demands of life while juggling the responsibilities of family, friendships, work, health, and money. She strives to be the best working mother, partner, and friend she can be, and she has to actively work to find a healthy balance. What the Dead Have Taught Me about Living Well walks you through an equally ordinary and extraordinary day in Rosen's life and reveals how she tunes in to see, hear, and feel the presence of spirits to help support and guide her forward. Through personal insights and shared extraordinary stories from the Other Side, she answers the question she's asked most frequently: How can my departed loved ones help guide me to live my best life?
     
    In What the Dead Have Taught Me about Living Well, Rosen shares the daily practices and spiritual tools she relies on to recognize and interpret signs from beyond. Spend a day with her. You'll learn how to strengthen your own connection to something bigger. This new perspective will help you better understand and navigate your day-to-day world so that new opportunities and possibilities unfold in all aspects of your life.
    Show book
  • A Skeptic's Guide to Writers' Houses - cover

    A Skeptic's Guide to Writers'...

    Anne Trubek

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    There are many ways to show our devotion to an author besides reading his or her works. Graves make for popular pilgrimage sites, but far more popular are writers' house museums. What is it we hope to accomplish by trekking to the home of a dead author? We may go in search of the point of inspiration, eager to stand on the very spot where our favorite literary characters first came to life—and find ourselves instead in the house where the author himself was conceived, or where she drew her last breath. Perhaps it is a place through which our writer passed only briefly, or maybe it really was a longtime home—now thoroughly remade as a decorator's show-house. 
    In A Skeptic's Guide to Writers' Houses Anne Trubek takes a vexed, often funny, and always thoughtful tour of a goodly number of house museums across the nation. In Key West she visits the shamelessly ersatz shrine to a hard-living Ernest Hemingway, while meditating on his lost Cuban farm and the sterile Idaho house in which he committed suicide. In Hannibal, Missouri, she walks the fuzzy line between fact and fiction, as she visits the home of the young Samuel Clemens—and the purported haunts of Tom Sawyer, Becky Thatcher, and Injun' Joe. She hits literary pay-dirt in Concord, Massachusetts, the nineteenth-century mecca that gave home to Hawthorne, Emerson, and Thoreau—and yet could not accommodate a surprisingly complex Louisa May Alcott. She takes us along the trail of residences that Edgar Allan Poe left behind in the wake of his many failures and to the burned-out shell of a California house with which Jack London staked his claim on posterity. In Dayton, Ohio, a charismatic guide brings Paul Laurence Dunbar to compelling life for those few visitors willing to listen; in Cleveland, Trubek finds a moving remembrance of Charles Chesnutt in a house that no longer stands. 
    Why is it that we visit writers' houses? Although admittedly skeptical about the stories these buildings tell us about their former inhabitants, Anne Trubek carries us along as she falls at least a little bit in love with each stop on her itinerary and finds in each some truth about literature, history, and contemporary America.
    Show book
  • Jeffrey Archer: The Kurds: The Simple Truth: Incorporating Parcels for the Gulf - cover

    Jeffrey Archer: The Kurds: The...

    Lorraine Holloway-White

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Imagine starting your day just like any other, then because of making a couple of telephone calls, by evening find yourself on television, radio and the front page of newspapers. That is what happened to me in 1991 and for the next few months, life would not be the same. 
    
    Picking up the telephone seemed an easy and innocent thing to do, yet that day, it threw me into a life of political intrigue and mystery. Government lies, meeting Princess Diana, going to Buckingham Palace, having dealings with government ministers, being talked about in Parliament for months and so much more is talked of in these pages.
    
    What you read will probably astound you. Living through it was satisfying, frustrating, exhilarating, exhausting, emotional, funny and scary. This is a true story the government never wanted you to hear. Those who have already seen it are astounded and angry at what they have discovered - that our government seemed to have been hiding everything to do with what happened – and still seem to be.
    Show book
  • Doris Fleeson - Incomparably the First Political Journalist of Her Time - cover

    Doris Fleeson - Incomparably the...

    Carolyn Sayler

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    "She was my idol," said columnist Mary McGrory. McGrory, in writing of women, referred to Doris Fleeson as "incomparably the first political journalist of her time." Fleeson was, in fact, the first woman in the United States to become a nationally syndicated political columnist. In 1945, with the encouragement of Henry Mencken, she launched her column. In her career she would write some 5,500 columns during the next twenty-two years. Fleeson's appearance could be disarming. Once at a party Lady Bird Johnson exclaimed, "What a gorgeous dress, Doris. It makes you look just like a sweet, old-fashioned girl." The wife of Senator Stuart Symington interjected, "Yes, just a sweet old-fashioned girl with a shiv in her hand." CAROLYN SAYLER lives in Lyons, Kansas, ten miles from the town of Sterling where Doris Fleeson was born in 1901. Knowing members of the Fleeson family, she began researching the life of the columnist whose straightforward take on Washington became a daily fix for newspaper readers across the nation. Sayler has a background in journalism as a member of a Kansas newspaper family. She is the author of a history of Manhattan, Kansas, which tells of the town's founding during the Free State struggle, its strong connections with New England, and its abolitionist college, now Kansas State University.
    Show book
  • Marshal of Victory - cover

    Marshal of Victory

    Georgy Zhukov

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    At Moscow, Leningrad, Stalingrad, Kursk and Berlin and in virtually all the principal battles on the Eastern Front during the Second World War, Georgy Zhukov played a major role. He was Stalin's pre-eminent general throughout the conflict, and in his autobiography he chronicled his brilliant career as he saw it - and wanted it to be seen.**His memoirs are fascinating reading because they portray in first-hand detail, through the entire course of the war, the*thinking and decision-making at the highest level of the Soviet command. They are one of the indispensable sources for studying the struggle in the east, and they give the reader an intriguing insight into Zhukov the man as well as Zhukov the commander.**This new edition of the memoirs, which were first published in heavily censored form in Russian in 1969, features a new*introduction by Professor Geoffrey Roberts who summarizes important additional material that was omitted from previous editions. He also provides, in an appendix, a translation of Zhukov's account of the 1953-7 period as well as an interview with Zhukov that has previously not been available in English.**Zhukov's autobiography is an essential text for readers who are keen to deepen their understanding of how Stalin and his generals conducted the war on the Eastern Front.
    Show book