Subscribe and enjoy more than 1 million books
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced 7236434c7af12f85357591f712aa5cce47c3d377e8addfc98f989c55a4ef4ca5
Shanna and the Raven: An Imbolc Story - Children's Wheel of the Year #1 - cover

Shanna and the Raven: An Imbolc Story - Children's Wheel of the Year #1

Arie Farnam

Publisher: Arie Farnam

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Intuition is calling.  
 
How do you know when the signs of nature and the whispers of your heart are true?  
 
Here is a story for Pagan, Wiccan and earth-centered families to share the wonder of the Wheel of the Year. Imbolc is a time for hearth fires and candlelight, the season for protection, healing, intuition and the first seeds of hope. Join us for a story of courage.  
 
A strange man talks to seven-year-old Rye one day at the bus stop. His sister, ten-year-old Shanna, doesn't feel good about it, but she has no real idea why. Nightmares and even a beady-eyed raven dog Shanna´s footsteps and their mother is suddenly out of work. As the celebration of Imbolc nears, Shanna wishes for some magic that will help dispel the troubles.  
 
If your kids like The American Girl series or The Magic Tree House series and you want to share adventure stories with them that feature earth-centered and Pagan holidays and ideas, this series is just the ticket.  
 
Welcome to our hearth and the Children's Wheel of the Year. Shanna and the Raven is the first book in the Children's Wheel of the Year series. Readers can read the books out of order, although they are connected and feature the same characters. There will be eight books in this series in all. You can find out about new releases by subscribing at www.ariefarnam.com/shannabooks. New subscribers can receive one free ebook of their choice by replying to one of Arie Farnam's hearth-side emails.

Other books that might interest you

  • Cowboy's Bride Collection - 9 Historical Romances Form on Old West Ranches - cover

    Cowboy's Bride Collection - 9...

    Susan Page Davis

    • 0
    • 3
    • 0
    Ride onto the open range alongside cowboys and cowgirls who embrace the adventures of living in the Old West from Kansas to New Mexico, Colorado to Texas. Whether rounding up cattle or mustangs, training horses, fending off outlaws, weathering storms, competing in rodeos, or surviving drought these cowboys work hard each day. But when hardheaded men have their weaknesses exposed by well-meaning women will they stampede away or will a lasting love develop? Find out in this exciting collection of nine historical romances.
    Show book
  • A New Name - cover

    A New Name

    Grace Livingston Hill

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    A young man's flight from justice brings him closer to God and the girl he loves.
    Show book
  • Roses for Mama (Women of the West Book #3) - cover

    Roses for Mama (Women of the...

    Janette Oke

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    She's cared for her siblings as best she could . . . but is it enough?   	Instead of the new life she and her family expected to forge out west, seventeen-year-old Angela is thrust into the role of caring for her three younger siblings after the death of their parents. With the help of her older brother, and trust in God, Angela is determined to raise the children as her mother would have wanted.As the youngsters grow, the questions and challenges intensify. Angela feels trapped and overwhelmed. Surely no man will ever want a woman who comes with three children in tow. Is this the plan God has for her life? Will she ever find a way to balance her own dreams with the promises she made to her mama?
    Show book
  • A Short Introduction to Classical Mythology - cover

    A Short Introduction to...

    John Lord

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Religion among the lively and imaginative Greeks took a different form from that of the Aryan race in India or Persia. However the ideas of their divinities originated in their relations to the thought and life of the people, their gods were neither abstractions nor symbols. They were simply men and women, immortal, yet having a beginning, with passions and appetites like ordinary mortals. They love, they hate, they eat, they drink, they have adventures and misfortunes like men,--only differing from men in the superiority of their gifts, in their miraculous endowments, in their stupendous feats, in their more than gigantic size, in their supernal beauty, in their intensified pleasures. It was not their aim "to raise mortals to the skies," but to enjoy themselves in feasting and love-making; not even to govern the world, but to protect their particular worshippers,--taking part and interest in human quarrels, without reference to justice or right, and without communicating any great truths for the guidance of mankind.
    The religion of Greece consisted of a series of myths,--creations for the most part of the poets,--and therefore properly called a mythology. Yet in some respects the gods of Greece resembled those of Phoenicia and Egypt, being the powers of Nature, and named after the sun, moon, and planets. Their priests did not form a sacerdotal caste, as in India and Egypt; they were more like officers of the state, to perform certain functions or duties pertaining to rites, ceremonies, and sacrifices. They taught no moral or spiritual truths to the people, nor were they held in extraordinary reverence. They were not ascetics or enthusiasts; among them were no great reformers or prophets, as among the sacerdotal class of the Jews or the Hindus. They had even no sacred books, and claimed no esoteric knowledge. Nor was their office hereditary. They were appointed by the rulers of the state, or elected by the people themselves; they imposed no restraints on the conscience, and apparently cared little for morals, leaving the people to an unbounded freedom to act and think for themselves, so far as they did not interfere with prescribed usages and laws. The real objects of Greek worship were beauty, grace, and heroic strength. The people worshipped no supreme creator, no providential governor, no ultimate judge of human actions. They had no aspirations for heaven and no fear of hell. They did not feel accountable for their deeds or thoughts or words to an irresistible Power working for righteousness or truth. They had no religious sense, apart from wonder or admiration of the glories of Nature, or the good or evil which might result from the favor or hatred of the divinities they accepted...
    Show book
  • Be Exultant (Psalms 90-150) - Praising God for His Mighty Works - cover

    Be Exultant (Psalms 90-150) -...

    Warren W. Wiersbe

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    "The school of life is preparation for eternity with God." No God, no passing grades! And the best students in this particular school are the ones who know that the bell signaling the end of the last class may ring when least expected. With creative word pictures like this, and the spiritual depth and insight that comes from a lifetime of worshipping the Lord, popular author, pastor, and teacher Dr. Warren W. Wiersbe guides you through the mountains and valleys of Psalms 90-150.
     
    Pastor or layperson, you'll devour the timeless truths this commentary has to offer. You will learn much from the practical nature of this study and the challenges it presents. But more important, you will see yourself in the different writers of the Psalms—pillars of the faith like Moses and David—people who experienced failure and doubt, but who also savored a deep relationship with a tenderhearted Father. You will not only learn of their trials and triumphs, but be lead to worship God in a more meaningful way.
    Show book
  • Girl of the Woods - cover

    Girl of the Woods

    Grace Livingston Hill

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Once when Revel Radcliffe was young and troubled by his widowed father's plans to remarry, he fled into the woods and met a young girl who was out picking wildflowers. Her words that day comforted him in his distress and introduced him to a lasting faith. Now as a man facing an uncertain future, he remembers that girl, who again helps him summon the courage to face a new day.
    Show book