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China on Strike - Narratives of Workers' Resistance - cover

China on Strike - Narratives of Workers' Resistance

Zhongjin Li, Eli Friedman, Hao Ren

Publisher: Haymarket Books

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Summary

China represents the future of global capitalism, and the future of the labor movement.Worlds largest worker rebellion is happening in China right now. The US media will not be covering this. China is now the largest economy in the worldUnited States has been enriching its military ties and trade relations in its "shift towards Asia"245 million people that have left the countryside to work in China's cities

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