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The Zane Grey Collection - cover

The Zane Grey Collection

Zane Grey

Publisher: Charles River Editors

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Summary

Karpathos publishes the greatest works of history's greatest authors and collects them to make it easy and affordable for readers to have them all at the push of a button.  All of our collections include a linked table of contents.

Zane Grey is probably the most popular writer of Western fiction.  With classics such as Riders of the Purple Sage and Betty Zane, Grey idealized the American frontier in literature and the arts.  This collection includes the following:

WESTERN NOVELS:
Betty Zane
The Spirit of the Border
The Last Trail
Riders of the Purple Sage
The Rainbow Trail
The Lone Star Ranger
The Border Legion
The Last of the Plainsmen
The Heritage of the Desert
The Young Forester
The Young Lion Hunter
Ken Ward in the Jungle
Desert Gold
The Light of the Western Stars
Wildfire
The U.P. Trail
The Desert of the Wheat
The Man of the Forest
The Mysterious Rider
To the Last Man
The Day of the Beast
The Call of the Canyon

WESTERN SHORT STORIES:
Tigre
Fantoms of Peace
The Horses of Bostil's Ford

BASEBALL STORIES:
The Young Pitcher
The Red Headed Outfield and Other Baseball Stories

NON-FICTION:
Tales of Fishes
Tales of Lonely Trails

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