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Essays of Woodrow Wilson - The New Freedom When A Man Comes To Himself The Study of Administration Leaders of Men The New Democracy - cover

Essays of Woodrow Wilson - The New Freedom When A Man Comes To Himself The Study of Administration Leaders of Men The New Democracy

Woodrow Wilson

Publisher: Madison & Adams Press

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Summary

Woodrow Wilson, a disciple of Walter Bagehot, considered the United States Constitution to be cumbersome and open to corruption. He favored a parliamentary system for the United States and in the early 1880s wrote, "I ask you to put this question to yourselves, should we not draw the Executive and Legislature closer together? Should we not, on the one hand, give the individual leaders of opinion in Congress a better chance to have an intimate party in determining who should be president, and the president, on the other hand, a better chance to approve himself a statesman, and his advisers capable men of affairs, in the guidance of Congress."
Essays presented in this book shed light to Wilsons's political thought and works. 
Contents: 
The New Freedom
When A Man Comes To Himself
The Study of Administration
Leaders of Men
The New Democracy

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