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100 Vegetables and Where They Came From - cover

100 Vegetables and Where They Came From

William Woys Weaver

Publisher: Algonquin Books

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Summary

A unique guide to “the botanical and cultural histories of vegetables originating from every corner of the globe”—with cooking tips and illustrations (Publishers Weekly). 
 
100 Vegetables and Where They Came From offers a cornucopia of vegetable knowledge and stories from around the world—from Argentina to Zimbabwe and from Australia to the United States. A historian, gardener, and veggie connoisseur, William Woys Weaver guides us through a range of peppers, potatoes, peas, gourds, onions, tomatoes, greens, and a whole lot more. 
 
Take the Petaluma Gold Rush bean, a rugged legume grown for over one-hundred-fifty years and brought to California by an American whaler from Peru. Or the violet carrot, which the Greeks brought back from India following the conquests of Alexander the Great. 
 
Mixing history, culinary suggestions, practical information, and personal anecdotes, Weaver introduces unusual heirloom vegetables and reveals surprising facts about common favorites. Organized alphabetically by common name, this book includes beautifully detailed drawings throughout and a helpful appendix of seed resources.
Available since: 11/01/2013.
Print length: 337 pages.

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