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The Art of Lawn Tennis - cover

The Art of Lawn Tennis

William T. Tilden

Publisher: iOnlineShopping.com

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Summary

Tennis is at once an art and a science. The game as played by such men as Norman E. Brookes, the late Anthony Wilding, William M. Johnston, and R.N. Williams is art. Yet like all true art, it has its basis in scientific methods that must be learned and learned thoroughly for a foundation before the artistic structure of a great tennis game can be constructed.

Why would the USTA want to bury this man and his writings to the Isle of Forgotten? This man, William T. Tilden, was the finest tennis player of any era. He was not nicknamed 'Big Bill' for nothing.How famous a tennis 'celebrity'? He was voted greatest athlete of the first half of the 20th century by athletes. 

This book represents one of several books by this great tennis mind. His thoughts on tennis psychology and match play alone make this book a must-be on the shelves of any tennis player today. Team tennis, professional tennis 'money' exhibitions, more organized professionalism all were promoted by this man.Read his thoughts of the future of tennis and see how foresighted he was. This great player wanted to be this way back then, and more so, against the USLTA wishes. Sad, but true. 

If you're a tennis player get all his writings, your game will improve accordingly. Bill Tilden set the tone and style of tennis development beyond "the infancy" he refers to the time of his play. His insights about his peers will help you analyze your fellow competitors as well.
 

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