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The Elements of Style - cover

The Elements of Style

William Strunk Jr.

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

The original edition of the concise classic, with essential advice for aspiring writers like “omit needless words.” With simple principles and helpful tips on usage and composition, as well as lists of common errors to avoid, The Elements of Style was first published during World War I by Cornell University professor William Strunk Jr. Originally intended for Cornell students, it would become widely renowned as a memorable short guide for those who want to write clear, correct, and effective prose. A staple in countless classrooms and a touchstone for generations, it is still relevant and useful a century later.

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