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TIS THE SEASON TO BE JOLLY - Christmas Carols & Poems - 150+ Holiday Songs Poetry & Rhymes - cover

TIS THE SEASON TO BE JOLLY - Christmas Carols & Poems - 150+ Holiday Songs Poetry & Rhymes

William Shakespeare, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Martin Luther, John John, Andrew Lang, William Makepeace Thackeray, Ben Jonson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Emily Dickinson, Robert Louis Stevenson, William Le Queux, Eugene Field, Charles Kingsley, Robert Browning, Robert Herrick, Ella Wheeler Wilcox, Isaac Watts, William Wordsworth, Phillips Brooks, Frances Ridley Havergal, James Russell Lowell, Walter Scott, William Butler Yeats, Rudyard Kipling, Carolyn Wells, Clement Clarke Moore, Charles Mackay, Margaret Deland, Robert Southwell, James Montgomery, Reginald Heber, Dinah Maria Mulock, Nora A. Smith, Thomas Hardy, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Eliza Cook, William Topaz McGonagall, Alfred Domett, William Drummond, George Wither, C. W. Stubbs, Edmund Hamilton Sears, Edmund Bolton, C.S. Stone, Harriet F. Blodgett, Christian Burke, Emily Huntington Miller, Cyril Winterbotham

Publisher: e-artnow

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Summary

This unique collection of Christmas carols, poems and songs is presented to you by e-artnow.
Table of Contents:
Silent Night
The Three Kings
Christmas Bells
Christmas At Sea
Angels from the Realms of Glory
Christmas in the Olden Time
Marmion: A Christmas Poem
Old Santa Claus
The Twelve Days of Christmas
Minstrels
Ring Out, Wild Bells
Christmas In India
Hymn On The Morning Of Christ's Nativity
A Christmas Carol
The Oxen
A Christmas Ghost Story
The Savior Must Have Been A Docile Gentleman
'Twas just this time, last year, I died
The Magi
The Mahogany Tree
A Bell
Christmas Carol
The Mystic's Christmas
Christmas Cheer
Noel: Christmas Eve 1913
The Holly and the Ivy
Adam lay ybounden
Christmas Day
Christmas Fancies
Twas jolly, jolly Wat
A Tale Of Christmas Eve
Jest 'Fore Christmas
A Christmas Folksong
As with Gladness Men of Old
Nativity a Christmas
Boar's Head Carol
Come, Thou Long Expected Jesus
Coventry Carol
Here We Come A-wassailing
A Defective Santa Claus
King Winter
Christmas Gifts and Other Poems
The Night After Christmas
O Little Town of Bethlehem
The Shepherds
A Christmas Carol
A Christmas Hymn
Brightest and Best of the Sons of the Morning
God Rest Ye, Merry Gentlemen
The Christmas Silence
A Christmas Lullaby
Hymn for the Nativity
Masters in This Hall
The Adoration of the Wise Men
The Shepherds in Judea
Christmas Carol
Neighbors of the Christ Night
Cradle Hymn
An Ode on the Birth of Our Saviour
Christmas Song
A Hymn on the Nativity of My Saviour
The Shepherd's Song
"While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks by Night"
The Angels
New Prince, New Pomp
Wassailer's Song
Sly Santa Claus
The Waits
God Bless Us Every One
Bells Across the Snow
Minstrels and Maids
Song of the Holly
Under the Holly-bough
December
The Christmas Holly
So, Now Is Come Our Joyfulst Feast
The Christmas Carol
A Christmas Carmen
Sery
A Christmas Song
The End of the Play
Christ's Nativity
Mark Well My Heavy, Doleful Tale
The Glorious Song of Old
A Christmas Carol for Children
A Christmas Carol
A Ballade of Old Loves
Ballade of Christmas Ghosts
Hang Up the Baby's Stocking
A Christmas Prayer…

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