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Epic Poems - cover

Epic Poems

William Shakespeare, John John, Various Authors, Dante Alighieri, Virgil Virgil, Lillian Kathleen Homer

Publisher: AB Books

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Summary

An epic poem is a lengthy narrative poem, ordinarily concerning a serious subject containing details of heroic deeds and events significant to a culture or nation.


This collection comprises the following classic epic works:

- The Iliad & The Odyssey by Homer

- The Aeneid of Virgil (I-VI) by Virgil

- The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri

- Venus and Adonis by William Shakespeare

- Paradise Lost by John Milton

- Paradise Regained by John Milton

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