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Amaz'n Murder - A Cozy Mystery Novel  - cover

Amaz'n Murder - A Cozy Mystery Novel 

William Maltese

Publisher: Wildside Press

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Summary

Move over, Jessica Fletcher and Miss Marple! Make room for another aging woman amateur sleuth--Carolyne Santire, plant-hunter extraordinaire! Carolyne's search for the next major botanical find takes her to Brazil in South America, where she encounters political machinations, mayhem, and...murder. The suspect list is long--fellow scientists, Brazilian land barons, prospectors, a cuckolded video director, a rock star--and, eventually, even her! During the shooting of an entertainment film in the Amazon jungle, amidst threats from a man-eating jaguar, cannibals, and a mysterious British kidnapper, Carolyne finds the prospect of ferreting out the real killer anything but a leisurely stroll in the park. Can she solve the mystery before the next murder occurs? 

A great "cozy" mystery read by a master storyteller.

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