Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Quinn's Book - A Novel - cover

Quinn's Book - A Novel

William Kennedy

Publisher: Open Road Media

  • 1
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

In 1849, a boy saves a girl from the Hudson River in this story “of wonders and sweetness, magic and horrors [that] immerses itself in the marvelous” (The Boston Sunday Globe). A penniless Irish orphan, Daniel Quinn is among the crowds gathered at the Hudson River in Albany to watch a legendary dancer aboard the ferry. But when the boat strikes the ice that chokes the water on this wintry day, awe turns to terror. Though the dancer’s life is lost, Daniel risks his neck and rescues her niece, Maud Fallon.   But just as he’s falling in love with the beautiful, passionate girl, she’s snatched away from him. As the years pass and Daniel continues his quest for the beguiling Maud, he will witness the rise and fall of great dynasties in upstate New York, epochal prize fights, the exotic world of the theater, visitations from spirits beyond the grave, horrific battles between Irish immigrants and the Know-Nothings, the New York draft riots, the perils of the Underground Railroad, and the bloody despair of the Civil War.   Rich with nineteenth-century history and filled with flourishes of humor and magical realism, this is an “engrossing and eerily profound” novel (Time) from an author who, in the words of Stephen King, “writes with verve and nerve [and] paints a full and lively canvas.” In the tradition of E. L. Doctorow’s Billy Bathgate or Mark Helprin’s Winter’s Tale, it is a remarkable saga from the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Ironweed.  
Available since: 01/03/2017.
Print length: 289 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • Visible Signs - cover

    Visible Signs

    Grace Marcus

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    In the aftermath of the turbulent 60s, unable to reconcile her monastic existence in upstate New York with the plight of the community’s poor, Sister Jude leaves the convent only to become ensnared in her best friend’s crumbling marriage. Intimidated by her talented but overbearing husband, Vincent, a pregnant Connie shows up at Jude’s door with her two children in tow.
     
    Jude's mission to feed the hungry and free Connie from her weakness for Vincent is complicated by her own attraction to Matt, a passionate but burned-out activist, back from the inner city to work his family’s farm.
     
    Tormented by Vincent’s treachery and Matt’s ultimatum, Jude learns how little she understands the vagaries of the heart. And that her fierce faith and determination may not be enough to save Connie from her husband, the children from danger or herself from a fall from grace.
     
    Praise for Visible Signs
     
    "Anyone who has stood on the cusp of change will relate to these characters, who comb through their pasts and examine the shards at their feet for clues to the true calling that will carry them forward. A historical novel that speaks to the daunting freedoms of our times." —Kathryn Craft, award-winning author of The Far End of Happy
     
    "Reader, beware . . . you don’t just read Visible Signs; you inhabit it. In luminous prose, Marcus tells the story of two women in the turbulent 1970s—Jude, a Catholic nun, and her childhood friend Connie, now a wife and mother—both questioning their vows and chafing against the frustrations of their very different paths. In a small town in upstate New York they find themselves on parallel quests, rethinking cherished assumptions about family and friendship, love and faith . . . and making choices that will change their lives forever." —Judith Ryan Hendricks, best-selling author of Bread Alone
     
    "For Sister Jude, a life of service to others takes on new meaning as she works to feed the hungry in her community and help a friend fleeing a dissolving marriage. Author Grace Marcus gives us these people with verve and compassion, from the nuns to the immigrants, from a traditional Italian family to the sensitive farmer who might just shift Sister Jude’s plans. This story of women re-examining their lives in the 1970s resonates strongly with our own times." —Valerie Nieman, author of In the Lonely Backwater
     
    "I was gripped by Jude's character and dilemma and by the vivid depiction of life in the monastery. Visible Signs is a wonderful novel, one that will captivate its readers!" —Ursula DeYoung, Editor, Embark: A Literary Journal for Novelists
     
    “In Visible Signs you'll meet and fall in love with Rita and Connie, old friends making new starts, both painful and promising. Like the Mary garden planted in the story, what is planted comes to fruition, feeding the deer as well as these two strong characters who know the price to be paid for claiming themselves. I loved it from start to finish.” —Jo-Ann Mapson, Author of Owen's Daughter and Solomon's Oak 
    Show book
  • The Miracle at St Bruno's - cover

    The Miracle at St Bruno's

    Philippa Carr

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    The first book in Philippa Carr’s celebrated Daughters of England series is at once a love story, a mystery, and an epic historical saga set during the tumultuous reign of Henry VIII  Damask Farland, named after a rose, is captivated by the mysterious orphan Bruno. Discovered upon the abbey altar on Christmas morning, then raised by monks, Bruno becomes the great man whom Damask grows to love—only to be shattered by his cruel betrayal.   This dramatic coming-of-age novel is set in sixteenth-century England, during the chaotic years when Henry VIII stunned the royal court by setting his sights on Anne Boleyn. It’s also the tale of a man whom many believed to be a holy prophet . . . until a shocking truth is unearthed in the shadows of a centuries-old abbey.
    Show book
  • The Marquis of Carabas - cover

    The Marquis of Carabas

    Rafael Sabatini

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    A master swordsman travels to dangerous, Revolution-era France to claim his inheritance, in this swashbuckling adventure by the author Captain Blood.The French Revolution is well underway. Countless French nobles are escaping from the horrible violence and traveling to England for refuge. Meanwhile, Quentin de Morlaix, master swordsman, runs a popular fencing school in London. He may have been raised in England since he was a baby, but his French blood gives him some sympathy for these emigrés. His concern for France ends there, until he receives a surprise from a lawyer. Quentin is a noble and he has six months to claim a sizable inheritance from a brother he never knew about. To claim his fortune, however, Quentin must travel into the heart of the French Revolution, a land of chaos, mystery, suspense, and certain death.
    Show book
  • The Truest Pleasure - A Novel - cover

    The Truest Pleasure - A Novel

    Robert Morgan

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    A “wondrous” novel of a marriage in the Appalachian Mountains, from the New York Times–bestselling author of Gap Creek (San Antonio Express-News).   Ginny and Tom have a lot in common—a love of the land, and fathers who fought in the Civil War. Tom’s father died, but Ginny’s father came back to western North Carolina to hold on to the farm and turn a profit. Ginny’s was a childhood of relative security, Tom’s one of landlessness. Truth be known—and they both know it—their marriage is mutually beneficial in purely practical terms. Tom wants land to call his own, and Ginny knows she can’t manage her aging father’s farm by herself.   But there is also mutual attraction, and a growing love as time passes. What keeps getting in the way of it, though, are their obsessions. Tom is a workaholic who hoards time and money. Ginny is obsessed by Pentecostal preaching. That she loses control of her dignity, that she speaks “in tongues,” that she is “saved,” seem to her a blessing and to Tom a disgrace. It’s not until Tom lies unconscious at the mercy of a disease for which the mountain doctor has no cure that Ginny’s truest pleasure comes into focus.   Named a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year, this novel by a winner of the Thomas Wolfe Prize is filled with “marvelously vivid imagery” and insight into the timeless truths of love and marriage (The New York Times Book Review).   “Morgan deeply understands these people and their world, and he writes about them with an authority usually associated with the great novelists of the last century . . . The book is astonishing.” —The Boston Book Review   “Simple, eloquent language . . . Pulses with poetry.” —The Washington Post Book World
    Show book