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Phantom Messages - Chilling Phone Calls Letters Emails and Texts from Unknown Realms - cover

Phantom Messages - Chilling Phone Calls Letters Emails and Texts from Unknown Realms

William J. Hall, Jimmy Petonito

Publisher: Disinformation Books

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Summary

Imagine these eerie phantom messages:A man answers the phone and hears himself on the line, sick and struggling. Soon after, he dies unexpectedly.You thought about calling a friend, but never got around to it. He calls you back—your message is on his voice mail.You receive emails from a deceased friend. He predicts your injury weeks before it happens.Extraterrestrials send you computer messages with startling predictions. They all come true.Discover life-altering direct contact by phone, computer, TV, radio, letter, and other mediums. From whom? Entities, loved ones, extraterrestrials, and bizarre beings from the past or future. They take photos, deliver warnings, cause havoc, transcend time, and more. At times you can hear past and future events in progress. Sometimes messages are friendly and welcoming, such as Thomas Harden from the year 1521. Other times? Your worst nightmare.Join William Hall and Jimmy Petonito on a mission to unravel the mysterious world of impossible communication. You’ll hear from witnesses and experts on scientific and paranormal theories, examine evidence and case characteristics, and share real life paranormal messages of hope, terror, time slips, and wonder. Bonus author investigations are also included. If you enjoy hauntings and UFO phenomena, you’ll love exploring the unforgettable Phantom Messages!

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