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The Green Goddess - Exploring Cultural Intersections and Dramatic Dialogues in Early 20th-Century Literature - cover

The Green Goddess - Exploring Cultural Intersections and Dramatic Dialogues in Early 20th-Century Literature

William Archer, Louise Jordan Miln

Publisher: Good Press

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Summary

In 'The Green Goddess,' readers find themselves amidst an intriguing anthology that stitches together the diverse tapestries of early 20th-century literature, fueled by the nuanced exploration of cultural intersections and human nature. This collection stands as a testament to the dynamic range of literary styles of the period, showcasing not just narratives but rich, cultural dialogues crafted through the pens of William Archer and Louise Jordan Miln. The anthology underscores the complexities of East meets West, an ever-pertinent theme, through its standout pieces that brilliantly navigate the realms of drama and romance under the umbrella of burgeoning societal shifts. The collaborative spirit of Archer and Miln punctuates this collection, harmonizing distinct voices that resonate with the ethos of their time. These authors, rooted deeply in their own cultural backdropsArcher with his Scottish heritage and critical acclaim in dramatic criticism, and Miln's immersive experiences in China, which deeply influence her narrative styles and thematic concernsbring forth a vividly painted anthology. Their collective works speak to the early modernist movements, capturing the essence of an era grappling with globalization. 'The Green Goddess' invites readers on a literary excursion that promises a rich blend of thought-provoking drama and poignant storytelling. This anthology is not merely a collection of works; it's a confluence of historical insights and artistic visions, offering a unique lens through which to explore early 20th-century literary landscapes. As such, it represents an invaluable resource for those seeking to understand the complexity of cultural narratives interwoven with the human experience, making it an essential addition to any literary enthusiast's collection.
Available since: 11/25/2019.
Print length: 216 pages.

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