Discover new books each day!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
A Lost Lady - cover

A Lost Lady

Willa Cather

Publisher: Lighthouse Books for Translation and Publishing

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Willa Cather's A Lost Lady was first published in 1923. It tells the story of Marian Forrester and her husband, Captain Daniel Forrester who live in the Western town of Sweet Water, along the Transcontinental Railroad. 
Willa Cather, in full Wilella Sibert Cather, (born December 7, 1873, near Winchester, Virginia, U.S.—died April 24, 1947, New York City, New York), American novelist noted for her portrayals of the settlers and frontier life on the American plains.
At age 9 Cather moved with her family from Virginia to frontier Nebraska, where from age 10 she lived in the village of Red Cloud. There she grew up among the immigrants from Europe—Swedes, Bohemians, Russians, and Germans—who were breaking the land on the Great Plains.
Meet extraordinary women who dared to bring gender equality and other issues to the forefront. From overcoming oppression, to breaking rules, to reimagining the world or waging a rebellion, these women of history have a story to tell.
At the University of Nebraska she showed a marked talent for journalism and story writing, and on graduating in 1895 she obtained a position in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on a family magazine. Later she worked as copy editor and music and drama editor of the Pittsburgh Leader. She turned to teaching in 1901 and in 1903 published her first book of verses, April Twilights. In 1905, after the publication of her first collection of short stories, The Troll Garden, she was appointed managing editor of McClure’s, the New York muckraking monthly. After building up its declining circulation, she left in 1912 to devote herself wholly to writing novels.
Cather’s first novel, Alexander’s Bridge (1912), was a factitious story of cosmopolitan life. Under the influence of Sarah Orne Jewett’s regionalism, however, she turned to her familiar Nebraska material. With O Pioneers! (1913) and My Ántonia (1918), which has frequently been adjudged her finest achievement, she found her characteristic themes—the spirit and courage of the frontier she had known in her youth. One of Ours (1922), which won the Pulitzer Prize, and A Lost Lady (1923) mourned the passing of the pioneer spirit.
In her earlier Song of the Lark (1915), as well as in the tales assembled in Youth and the Bright Medusa (1920), including the much-anthologized “Paul’s Case,” and Lucy Gayheart (1935), Cather reflected the other side of her experience—the struggle of a talent to emerge from the constricting life of the prairies and the stifling effects of small-town life.
Cather’s will erected strong protections around her intellectual property, preventing adaptations of her fiction and forbidding publication of her correspondence. However, upon the 2011 death of a nephew who had served as her last designated executor, copyright of her work passed to the Willa Cather Trust. The trust—a partnership of the Willa Cather Foundation, Cather’s remaining family, and the University of Nebraska Foundation—lifted the prohibitions on publishing her letters. Though Cather had destroyed much of her own epistolary record, nearly 3,000 missives were tracked down by scholars, and 566 were collected in The Selected Letters of Willa Cather (2013). 
 

Other books that might interest you

  • Holidays Are Hell - cover

    Holidays Are Hell

    Kim Harrison, Lynsay Sands,...

    • 2
    • 7
    • 0
    This holiday, spend quality time with family and loved ones—living and dead . . . 
    There's no place like home for the horrordays—unless you'd prefer a romantic midnight walk through a ghost-infested graveyard . . . or a haunted house candlelight dinner with the sexy vampire of your dreams. The (black) magical season is here—and whether it's a solstice séance gone demonically wrong with the incomparable Kim Harrison, a grossly misshapen Christmas with the remarkable Lynsay Sands, a blood-chilling-and-spilling New Year's with the wonderful Marjorie M. Liu, or a super-powered Thanksgiving with the phenomenal Vicki Pettersson, one thing is for certain: in the able hands of these exceptional dark side explorers, the holidays are going to be deliciously hellish!
    Show book
  • Toxic Love - The Shocking True Story of the First Murder by Cancer - cover

    Toxic Love - The Shocking True...

    Tomás Guillén

    • 0
    • 17
    • 2
    The chilling true story of romantic obsession and murder by cancer from the New York Times–bestselling author of The Search for the Green River Killer.Omaha, Nebraska, 1978. Sandy Johnson was in shock. Her husband, Duane, and young daughter, Sherrie, were violently ill when word arrived that her infant nephew just died of mysterious causes. Days earlier, the entire family was happy, healthy, and living the American dream. Now they were at the center of a terrifying medical crisis.   Duane soon died in a condition unlike anything the doctors had ever seen. As they raced to discover what disease or toxin could have done so much damage so quickly, Lt. Foster Burchard of the Omaha police began to suspect foul play. Sandy herself became a primary suspect, as did her ex-boyfriend Steven Harper—a man prone to violence who never got over their breakup.   In Toxic Love, investigative reporter and true crime author Tomás Guillén offers a detailed and vivid account of this baffling case from the day of the poisoning to the harrowing trial and the murderer’s eventual suicide on death row.  
    Show book
  • Think Little - Essays - cover

    Think Little - Essays

    Wendell Berry

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    The first in the new Counterpoints series, Think Little is an evergreen, ever-urgent, and now pocket-sized argument for focused and inclusive climate change activism
    Designed and priced for point-of-sale, the Counterpoints series will feature essays, poems, and stories from Wendell Berry, Gary Snyder, Mary Robison, Betty Fussell, MFK Fisher, and many more
    Berry argues that environmental activism and policy change cannot only be a public, large-scale, corporate- and organization-led; instead, changes must happen at the person, individual, and community levels in order for our attempts to slow climate change to be successful. Just as the Civil Rights movement had to become personal, had to be adopted in homes and communities across the country in order to gain momentum and critical mass, so too does environmental activism
    Berry also reminds us that the forces that would exploit people based on their race, gender, and socioeconomic status are the same forces that are content to exploit the earth for its natural resources
    Show book
  • The Mistresses of Henry VIII - cover

    The Mistresses of Henry VIII

    Kelly Hart

    • 1
    • 3
    • 0
    Seventeen-year-old Henry VIII was 'a youngling, he cares for nothing but girls and hunting.' Henry was considered a demi-god by his subjects, so each woman he chose was someone who had managed to stand out in a crowd of stunning ladies. This book offers an insight into the love life of Henry, and the twelve women who knew the man behind the mask.
    Show book
  • Yellow Arrow Journal Doubt: Vol IV No 1 Winter 2019 - Yellow Arrow Journal - cover

    Yellow Arrow Journal Doubt: Vol...

    Ann Quinn, Roz Weaver, Yellow...

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Volume IV, No. 1 of Yellow Arrow Journal released winter 2019. Poetry and creative nonfiction by writers that identify as women on the theme of DOUBT. 
    Featuring: T.J. Butler, Jessica Cappelluti, Diane Finlayson, Jessica Gregg, Tami Lauteren, Edele C. Morgan, Ann Quinn, Mindy Stokes, and Roz Weaver. 
    Editors: Kapua Iao, Gwen Van Velsor, and Leila Warshaw. 
     
    Thank you for supporting independent publishing.
    Show book
  • Deadly Darlings: The Horrifying True Accounts of Children Turned Into Murderers - Murder and Mayhem #2 - cover

    Deadly Darlings: The Horrifying...

    William Webb

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    ★★★  The scariest children you'll ever meet  ★★★ 
      
    If you've ever thought your child was bad, then you haven't seen anything yet! In the pages that follow, you are about to meet some of the most vicious children who ever lived. 
      
    The kids in this book are as young as ten-years-old and they are ruthless. The nice ones killed in cold blood—but many of these kids weren't nice…they wanted their victims to suffer. 
      
    Some were turned killers by their brutal home environments; others were just inherently evil. They were all deadly darlings you'd never want to meet on the street.
    Show book