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Adventures in the Far West - cover

Adventures in the Far West

W.H.G. Kingston

Publisher: Passerino Editore

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Summary

A group of tough young Brits make their way to the west of North America, where there are numerous hazards, in the form of grizzly bears, wolves, and a few tribes of Indians who definitely did not want them there.

William Henry Giles Kingston (28 February 1814 – 5 August 1880), often credited as W. H. G. Kingston, was an English writer of boys' adventure novels.
Available since: 09/06/2016.

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