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The New Forest - Its History and its Scenery - cover

The New Forest - Its History and its Scenery

Walter Crane, John Richard De Capel Wise

Publisher: White Press

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Summary

First published in 1862, this vintage book contains a detailed and profusely-illustrated guide to the New Forest area of England. Including detailed historical information as well as beautiful contemporary observations and descriptions, “The New Forest - Its History and its Scenery” is not to be missed by those with an interest in this beautiful area of England and the English countryside in general. Contents include: “Its scenery”, “Its Early History”, “Its Later History”, “Calshot Castle and the Old South-eastern Coast”, “Beaulieu Abbey”, “The South-western Part—Brockenhurst, Boldre, Sway, Hinchelsea, and Burley”, “The Central Part—Lyndhurst”, “Minestead and Rufus's Stone”, “The Northern Part—Stoney-Cross, Bramble Hill, Fritham, Bentley, Eyeworth, Sloden”, etc. Many vintage books such as this are becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. It is with this in mind that we are republishing this volume now in an affordable, high-quality edition for the enjoyment of modern readers.

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