If you like reading, you will LOVE reading without limits!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Martyrs and Tricksters - An Ethnography of the Egyptian Revolution - cover

Martyrs and Tricksters - An Ethnography of the Egyptian Revolution

Walter Armbrust

Publisher: Princeton University Press

  • 1
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

An important look at the hopeful rise and tragic defeat of the Egyptian Revolution of 2011 
The Egyptian Revolution of 2011 began with immense hope, but was defeated in two and a half years, ushering in the most brutal and corrupt regime in modern Egyptian history. How was the passage from utmost euphoria into abject despair experienced, not only by those committed to revolutionary change, but also by people indifferent or even hostile to the revolution? In Martyrs and Tricksters, anthropologist and Cairo resident Walter Armbrust explores the revolution through the lens of liminality—initially a communal fellowship, where everything seemed possible, transformed into a devastating limbo with no exit. To make sense of events, Armbrust looks at the martyrs, trickster media personalities, public spaces, contested narratives, historical allusions, and factional struggles during this chaotic time. 
Armbrust shows that while martyrs became the primary symbols of mobilization, no one took seriously enough the emergence of political tricksters. Tricksters appeared in media—not the vaunted social media of a “Facebook revolution” but television—and they paved the way for the rise of Abd al-Fattah al-Sisi. In the end Egypt became a global political vanguard, but not in the way the revolutionaries intended. What initially appeared as the gateway to an age of revolution has transformed the world over into the age of the trickster. 
Delving into how Egyptians moved from unprecedented exhilaration to confusion and massacre, Martyrs and Tricksters is a powerful cultural biography of a tragic revolution.

Other books that might interest you

  • Black Liberation and Socialism - cover

    Black Liberation and Socialism

    Ahmed Shawki

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A sharp and insightful analysis of historic movements against racism in the United States—from the separatism of Marcus Garvey, to the militancy of Malcolm X and the Black Panther Party, to the eloquence of Martin Luther King Jr. and much more—with essential lessons for today’s struggles. 
    In the 40 years since the civil rights movement, many gains have been made—but there is still far to go to win genuine change. Here is a badly needed primer on the history and future of the struggle against racism. 
    Ahmed Shawki is the editor of the International Socialist Review. A member of the National Writers Union, he is also a contributor to The Struggle for Palestine (Haymarket). He lives in Chicago, Illinois.
    Show book
  • The Diplomacy of Migration - Transnational Lives and the Making of US-Chinese Relations in the Cold War - cover

    The Diplomacy of Migration -...

    Meredith Oyen

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    During the Cold War, both Chinese and American officials employed a wide range of migration policies and practices to pursue legitimacy, security, and prestige. They focused on allowing or restricting immigration, assigning refugee status, facilitating student exchanges, and enforcing deportations. The Diplomacy of Migration focuses on the role these practices played in the relationship between the United States and the Republic of China both before and after the move to Taiwan. Meredith Oyen identifies three patterns of migration diplomacy: migration legislation as a tool to achieve foreign policy goals, migrants as subjects of diplomacy and propaganda, and migration controls that shaped the Chinese American community. Using sources from diplomatic and governmental archives in the United States, the Republic of China on Taiwan, the People’s Republic of China, and the United Kingdom, Oyen applies a truly transnational perspective. The Diplomacy of Migration combines important innovations in the field of diplomatic history with new international trends in migration history to show that even though migration issues were often considered "low stakes" or "low risk" by foreign policy professionals concerned with Cold War politics and the nuclear age, they were neither "no risk" nor unimportant to larger goals. Instead, migration diplomacy became a means of facilitating other foreign policy priorities, even when doing so came at great cost for migrants themselves.
    Show book
  • Discord and Consensus in the Low Countries 1700-2000 - cover

    Discord and Consensus in the Low...

    Jane Fenoulhet, Dr Gerdi Quist,...

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    All countries, regions and institutions are ultimately built on a degree of consensus, on a collective commitment to a concept, belief or value system. This consensus is continuously rephrased and reinvented through a narrative of cohesion and challenged by expressions of discontent and discord. The history of the Low Countries is characterised by both a striving for consensus and eruptions of discord, both internally and from external challenges. This interdisciplinary volume explores consensus and discord in a Low Countries context along broad cultural, linguistic and historical lines. Disciplines represented include early-modern and contemporary history; art history; film; literature; and translation scholars from both the Low Countries and beyond.
    Show book
  • Rules for Resistance - Advice from Around the Globe for the Age of Trump - cover

    Rules for Resistance - Advice...

    David Cole, Melanie Wachtell...

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Hot topic: Masha Gessen’s New York Review of Books piece “Autocracy: Rules for Survival” went viral. People are scared and hungry for advice. In offering suggestions from people who have experienced repressive governments first hand, the book offers a unique angle.
    Big name contributors: Ai Weiwei, George Soros, Ariel Dorfman, Nadya Tolokonnikova of Pussy Riot, etc.
    ACLU affiliation: David Cole, a long-time New Press author, has just been appointed legal director of the ACLU and he sees this book as a calling card. We expect that he will promote the book in conjunction with laying out the ALCU’s mandate for the media.
    Timing: Will publish in the summer.
    Part of our “Fearless Book for Perilous Times” special catalog: We expect special attention for our post-election catalog, which will be featured in news stories in conjunction with The New Press’s 25th anniversary this year.
    Show book
  • Making Political Science Matter - Debating Knowledge Research and Method - cover

    Making Political Science Matter...

    Brian Caterino, Sanford F. Schram

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Making Political Science Matter brings together a number of prominent scholars to discuss the state of the field of Political Science. In particular, these scholars are interested in ways to reinvigorate the discipline by connecting it to present day political struggles. Uniformly well-written and steeped in a strong sense of history, the contributors consider such important topics as: the usefulness of rational choice theory; the ethical limits of pluralism; the use (and misuse) of empirical research in political science; the present-day divorce between political theory and empirical science; the connection between political science scholarship and political struggles, and the future of the discipline. This volume builds on the debate in the discipline over the significance of the work of Bent Flyvbjerg, whose book Making Social Science Matter has been characterized as a manifesto for the Perestroika Movement that has roiled the field in recent years.Contributors include: Brian Caterino, Stewart Clegg, Bent Flyvbjerg, Mary Hawkesworth, Patrick Thaddeus Jackson, Gregory J. Kasza, David Kettler, David D. Laitin, Timothy W. Luke, Theodore R. Schatzki, Sanford F. Schram, Peregrine Schwartz-Shea, Corey S. Shdaimah, Roland W. Stahl, and Leslie Paul Thiele.
    Show book
  • The End of Grand Strategy - US Maritime Operations in the Twenty-First Century - cover

    The End of Grand Strategy - US...

    Simon Reich, Peter Dombrowski

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    In The End of Grand Strategy, Simon Reich and Peter Dombrowski challenge the common view of grand strategy as unitary. They eschew prescription of any one specific approach, chosen from a spectrum that stretches from global primacy to restraint and isolationism, in favor of describing what America’s military actually does, day to day. They argue that a series of fundamental recent changes in the global system, the inevitable jostling of bureaucratic politics, and the practical limitations of field operations combine to ensure that each presidential administration inevitably resorts to a variety of strategies. Proponents of different American grand strategies have historically focused on the pivotal role of the Navy. In response, Reich and Dombrowski examine six major maritime operations, each of which reflects one major strategy. One size does not fit all, say the authors—the attempt to impose a single overarching blueprint is no longer feasible. Reich and Dombrowski declare that grand strategy, as we know it, is dead. The End of Grand Strategy is essential reading for policymakers, military strategists, and analysts and critics at advocacy groups and think tanks.
    Show book