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Leaves of Grass - cover

Leaves of Grass

Walt Whitman

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

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Summary

Leaves of Grass, featuring beloved poems such as “Oh Captain! My Captain!” and “Song of Myself,” was met with both scathing criticism and glowing praise when it was originally published in 1855; Walt Whitman continues to inspire readers today.  

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