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Dictionary of Pagan Religions - cover

Dictionary of Pagan Religions

Wade Baskin, Harry E Wedeck

Publisher: Philosophical Library/Open Road

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Summary

A comprehensive reference guide to religious cults of the ancient world, with essential information on religious systems, texts, temple sites, and more.   Dictionary of Pagan Religions offers a wide-ranging survey of the many religious cults that have flourished around the world from the Stone Age to the present. From Egyptian to Celtic traditions, and Gnosticism to Cabala, coauthors Harry E. Wedeck and Wade Baskin have compiled in-depth information about the rites and rituals associated with these religious systems, as well as their surprisingly significant influence on mainstream theology and philosophy.   This authoritative text includes many of the world’s forgotten religions, with important information about their ideologies, practices, mythologies, and more. Arranged in A-to-Z format, Dictionary of Pagan Religions is an essential reference guide for any student of paganism, polytheism, or ancient religious practices.

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