Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
The Fishing Industry - cover

The Fishing Industry

W. E. Gibbs

Publisher: Charles River Editors

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

The Fishing Industry is an interesting overview of the fishing industry in Great Britain in the early 20th century.

Other books that might interest you

  • Learning the Splits - A practically oriented book with easy-to-understand instructions and lots of photos - cover

    Learning the Splits - A...

    Petra Lahnstein

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    "Can you recommend a book for my daughter so that I know she's doing the exercises properly when she practices at home?"
    During my years as trainer, I've often encountered parents and young dancers looking for a book that teaches them how to do the splits. Now I can recommend this book to everyone. It's a great reference book with lots of illustrations and easy to understand explanations."
    Petra Lahnstein
    The splits fascinate dancers, athletes and their audiences. That's why they are still an indispensable element of many sport disciplines. "Learning the Splits" is a practical book that shows anyone who is interested how to do the splits.
    Show book
  • The Amazing Test Match Crime - cover

    The Amazing Test Match Crime

    Adrian Alington

    • 1
    • 9
    • 0
    All England waited with passionate eagerness for the final match to be played at the Oval. For this was to be played to a finish and would decide the fate of the Ashes. 
     
    It is 1938 and England is brimming with excitement as the final Test Match against Imperia draws near. But no corner of the land has the fate of the Ashes closer to its heart than the village of Wattlecombe Ducis, Glebeshire. 
     
     
    It was here at the Manor House that Norman Blood, captain of England, spent his childhood playing cricket with the vicar's radiant daughter, Monica. And it was she who presented young but poor Joe Prestwick with a belt on the occasion of his first game of cricket, saving his honour for as Sir Timothy Blood remarked, 'I would rather see the whole village dead at my feet than a man bowling in braces.' 
     
    With a short – but sensational – career behind him, Joe just needs to be selected to play at the Oval to win Monica's heart and her hand in marriage: everything depends on the Test. 
     
    But The Bad Men, Europe's most wanted gang, have no intention of letting the best team win. Sawn-off Carlo, The Professor and Ralph the Disappointment (an Englishman who, knowing the rules of the Game, is eternally damned for not playing by them) plan to strike a blow at the very heart of proud Albion and her Empire.  
     
    The Amazing Test Match Crime, first published in 1939, is a wicked yet affectionate comedy of cricketing (and criminal) manners, proving – as if proof were needed – that a straight bat and nimble spinning finger will always win through.
    Show book
  • Camping on the Wye - cover

    Camping on the Wye

    S. K. Baker

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    During their university holidays in the late 1880s, S.K. Baker and three of his University College friends clad in stripy blazers and boaters spent time sailing and camping on the River Wye. Baker, a keen artist and diarist, recorded their travels in watercolour in two small leather bound books. 
     
    The result is an entirely charming, funny account along the lines of the legendary Three Men in a Boat with which the notebooks are entirely contemporaneous although the protagonists are younger and possibly naughtier. Baker records their evenings in the pub, their encounters with girls, (both ashore and afloat), nude swimming and culinary disasters, while recording lovingly the landscape and the boats on which they sailed. 
     
    The notebook is published as a facsimile with an introduction by Michael Goffe, the son of one of Baker's fellow students (GG in the text), to whom it was gifted.
    Show book
  • A Season in the Sun - cover

    A Season in the Sun

    Roger Kahn

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Through visiting the game’s players and veterans of all ages and skill levels, a writer chronicles the state of baseball in the summer of 1976. For one full baseball season in 1976, Roger Kahn returned to his favorite sport to see how it was doing and find out whether it still had the same old magic. His search led him from small college teams in rural Arkansas, whose every member hopes to make the Majors, to Houston for a look at the financial disaster of the Astros and the Astrodome, and to Los Angeles to explore the modern miracle of Walter O’Malley’s Dodgers. It brought him interviews with old friends like restaurateur Stan Musial, boat salesman Early Wynn, and the courageous baseball maverick Bill Veeck, now owner of the Chicago White Sox. He was able to observe a superb New England Class A team that plays to empty stands because of TV, and the phenomenon of baseball enthusiasm on Roberto Clemente’s Caribbean island. Finally, it gave him the chance to get to know the incomparable Johnny Bench and to spend part of the 1976 Yankees-Reds World Series in the company of the Series’ most valuable player. More than a book about baseball, A Season in the Sun, like Kahn’s classic The Boys of Summer, is a warm and affectionate evocation of small-town and big-city America.Praise for Roger Kahn “He can epitomize a player with a single swing of the pen.”—TimeMagazine “Kahn is the best baseball writer in the business.”—Stephen Jay Gould, New York Review of Books “Kahn has the almost unfair gift of easy, graceful writing.”—Boston Herald
    Show book
  • Champions Way - Football Florida and the Lost Soul of College Sports - cover

    Champions Way - Football Florida...

    Mike McIntire

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Champions Way is a searing exposé of how the multibillion-dollar college sports empire fails universities, students, and athletes.College sports have never been bigger. Once a roughneck intercollegiate pastime, football now commands millions of fans and generates massive revenues. New York Times investigative reporter Mike McIntire chronicles the rise in the popularity and power of college athletics, revealing deeply troubling relationships between college sports programs, the universities that host them, booster organizations, local police departments, and the courts. Using the Florida State Seminoles, one of the most successful teams in NCAA history, as an example, McIntire details a system that exploits athletes for profit, enables players to violate academic standards and, in some cases, shields them from criminal prosecution.At the heart of Champions Way is the wrenching story of a whistleblower, Christie Suggs. This shocking exposé reveals the extent of a corrupt culture at the center of American higher education, and the toll it takes on the players and those who dare to challenge the system.
    Show book
  • Get Into Sport: Less is More - Episode 8 - cover

    Get Into Sport: Less is More -...

    Damian Hall

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    How you could get fitter by spending less time in the gym
    Show book