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The Moon and Sixpence - cover

The Moon and Sixpence

W. Somerset Maugham

Publisher: iBoo Press House

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Summary

The Moon and Sixpence is a 1919 short novel by William Somerset Maugham based on the life of the painter Paul Gauguin. The story is told in episodic form by the first-person narrator as a series of glimpses into the mind and soul of the central character, Charles Strickland, a middle aged English stock broker who abandons his wife and children abruptly to pursue his desire to become an artist. 
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