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Marching Spain - cover

Marching Spain

V.S. Pritchett

Publisher: Bloomsbury Reader

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Summary

In spring 1927 V.S Pritchett set out to walk 300 miles across Spain. The country was almost completely isolated, and Pritchett describes a timeless country on the cusp of being riven by civil war, populated by a wonderful selection of characters.

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