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Destroyer of Sorrow - cover

Destroyer of Sorrow

Vrinda Sheth

Publisher: Mandala Publishing

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Summary

“Gorgeously illustrated throughout . . . A powerfully dramatic retelling of a Hindu epic.” —Kirkus Reviews 
 
Delve into the world of Hindu mythology in this beautifully illustrated modern retelling of the classic epic Ramayana. 
 
In the majestic conclusion to this one-of-a-kind trilogy, the saga of the Ramayana finally comes to an end. The Ramayana, one of the longest ancient epics in the world, is rendered into modern form in Destroyer of Sorrow, which finishes off the sacred story, as Rama finally returns to Ayodhya, after fourteen long years of exile, to assume his rightful place as king. 
 
“Magnificent, riveting, and heart-wrenching.” —Jai Uttal, Grammy Award-nominated musician 
 
“What Vrinda Sheth has done with this adaptation is incredible. She writes with the pace of a thriller and the sensitivity of a poet. It’s a combination that illuminates this classic with an extraordinary new light.” —Mukunda Michael Dewil, director of Vehicle 19
Available since: 04/20/2021.
Print length: 333 pages.

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