Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Candide and Other Works - cover

Candide and Other Works

Voltaire Voltaire

Translator James Fowler

Publisher: Wordsworth Editions

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

With an Introduction and Notes by James Fowler, Senior Lecturer in French, University of Kent
 
                                                
 
                                                
 
                                                                 
 
                                                Candide (1759) is a bright, colourful literary firework display of a novella. With sparkling wit and biting humour, Voltaire hits several targets with fierce and comic satire: organised religion, the overweening pride of aristocrats, merchants' greed, colonial ambition and the hopeless complacency of Leibnizian philosophy that believes 'all is for the best in the best of all possible worlds'. Through this rites of passage story, with his central character, Candide, a naïve and impressionable young man, Voltaire attacks the social ills of his day, which remarkably remain as pertinent now as ever.
 

 

 

 
Zadig is a tale of love and detection. Edgar Allan Poe was inspired by this story when he created C. Auguste Dupin in 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue', a story which established the modern detective fiction genre. The Ingenu recounts how a young man raised by Huron Indians discover the ways of Europe.  Nanine is a sharp three act comedy concerned with marital dilemmas. In all these works Voltaire manages to combine humour with trenchant satire in a highly entertaining fashion.

Other books that might interest you

  • Hop-Frog - cover

    Hop-Frog

    Edgar Allan Poe

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Hop-Frog is a short story by American writer Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1849. The title character is a dwarf taken from his homeland who becomes the jester of a king particularly fond of practical jokes. Taking revenge on the king and his cabinet for striking his friend and fellow dwarf Trippetta, he dresses them as orangutans for a masquerade. In front of the king's guests, Hop-Frog murders them all by setting their costumes on fire before escaping with Trippetta. It has been suggested that Poe wrote the story as a form of literary revenge against a woman named Elizabeth F. Ellet and several others.
    Show book
  • Spring Pictures - cover

    Spring Pictures

    Katherine Mansfield

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Katherine Mansfield (1888-1923) was a prominent modernist writer of short fiction and a close associate of D. H. Lawrence and Virginia Woolf. 
    "Spring Pictures" is a series of exquisite and evocative sketches from Mansfield's 1915 travels in France behind the lines during the First World War.
    Show book
  • Sybil - or The Two Nations - cover

    Sybil - or The Two Nations

    Benjamin Disraeli

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    'Two nations; between whom there is no intercourse and no sympathy' - thus Disraeli characterised the state of relations between England's rich and poor as Queen Victoria ascended the throne. in both town and country there was trouble as the new centres of industrial and commercial wealth grew but lacked parliamentry representation, while the poor starved. Written as part of Disraeli's 'Young England' campaign to reform the Tory party, Sybil is an eloquent tribute to a statesman whose considerable literary talent is often obscured by his glittering political career.
    Show book
  • Far From The Madding Crowd - cover

    Far From The Madding Crowd

    Thomas Hardy

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Far From The Madding Crowd is much more than a tale of rural life; at times the principal characters act madly enough to make the title seem ironic. Hardy subtly spins his story around the disruption of a small community by two differing but equally strong willed outsiders, Bathsheba and Troy.  In the end Bathsheba learns from the whirlwind of passion she has unleashed and settles for the best of her suitors.  Meanwhile, the beauty of the countryside and the down-to-earth attitudes of the farm workers provide a natural backdrop to the story.
    Show book
  • Moby Dick - cover

    Moby Dick

    Herman Melville

    • 1
    • 5
    • 0
    With an Introduction and Notes by David Herd, Lecturer in English and American Literature at the University of Kent at Canterbury and co-editor of ‘Poetry Review’.
     
     
    Moby Dick is the story of Captain Ahab’s quest to avenge the whale that ‘reaped’ his leg. The quest is an obsession and the novel is a diabolical study of how a man becomes a fanatic.
     
     
    But it is also a hymn to democracy. Bent as the crew is on Ahab’s appalling crusade, it is equally the image of a co-operative community at work: all hands dependent on all hands, each individual responsible for the security of each.
     
     
    Among the crew is Ishmael, the novel’s narrator, ordinary sailor, and extraordinary reader. Digressive, allusive, vulgar, transcendent, the story Ishmael tells is above all an education:
     
     
    in the practice of whaling, in the art of writing. Expanding to equal his ‘mighty theme’ – not only the whale but all things sublime – Melville breathes in the world’s great literature. Moby Dick is the greatest novel ever written by an American.
    Show book
  • Ragged Dick - cover

    Ragged Dick

    Horatio Alger

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Ragged Dick is the story of a young bootblack living and working in the streets of a post-Civil War New York City. It follows his rise from a street kid to the respectable middle class. The original publication, released as a six volume series, came to depict a time of post-war struggle through the eyes of its young victims, vagabond children. Originally written as young-adult moral tales using the classic rags-to-riches theme, Ragged Dick is also Algers' timeless snapshot into an all but forgotten period in American history, and the ever relevant struggle for economic and social status.
    Show book