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Bicycles Bloomers and Great War Rationing Recipes - The Life and Times of Dorothy Peel OBE - cover

Bicycles Bloomers and Great War Rationing Recipes - The Life and Times of Dorothy Peel OBE

Victoria Straker

Publisher: Pen & Sword History

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Summary

The remarkable life and culinary career of the Martha Stewart of World War–era Britain.   Dorothy Peel played a key role in creating wartime recipes for householders and was awarded an OBE in 1918 for services to the Ministry of Food. In this fascinating book, Vicky Straker explores the social history and cultural background behind Dorothy’s creations, and the effect of rationing during the First World War. Using extracts from her autobiography, and many other books, we are given a unique insight into the life of Dorothy Peel and a new perspective on the period. Her witty, poignant, and informative comments reveal a woman with a genuine social conscience, who was in many ways ahead of her time.   Written in a light and accessible style, Bicycles, Bloomers and Great War Rationing Recipes reveals how society changed during the First World War, when rationing put a strain on every kitchen in the country. Many of Dorothy’s recipes are featured in their original form, such as the long forgotten Devilled Bananas and wartime Potato Gateau. Other mouth-watering recipes include Chicken en Casserole, Cheese Pufflets, and some delicious tea-time treats such as Feather Tart and Candied Pears. Vicky Straker has tried and tested recipes from Dorothy’s cookery books, and where appropriate amended them to suit modern tastes.   “Superb biography, and some really interesting recipes to try!” —Books Monthly  

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