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Don't Stop Me Now - 262 Tales of a Runner’s Obsession - cover

Don't Stop Me Now - 262 Tales of a Runner’s Obsession

Vassos Alexander

Publisher: Bloomsbury Sport

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Summary

This is a celebration of running - and what lots of us think about when  we run. Part escape, part self-discovery, part therapy, part fitness.  Part simple childlike joy of running when you could be walking. 
Vassos Alexander shares the highs and lows of falling in love with running, from his first paltry efforts to reach the end of his street to completing ultra marathons and triathlons in the same weekend.  
Each of the 26.2 chapters also features a fascinating insight into how others first started – from Paula Radcliffe to Steve Cram, the Brownlees to Jenson Button, Nicky Campbell to Nell McAndrew.  
Also includes a foreword by Chris Evans. 
Funny, inspiring, honest - the perfect read for anyone with well-worn trainers by the door (or thinking of buying a pair...)

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