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The Complete Works of Benjamin Franklin - Letters and Papers on Electricity Philosophical Subjects General Politics Moral Subjects & the Economy American Subjects Before & During the Revolution - cover

The Complete Works of Benjamin Franklin - Letters and Papers on Electricity Philosophical Subjects General Politics Moral Subjects & the Economy American Subjects Before & During the Revolution

V Franklin

Publisher: Madison & Adams Press

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Summary

This collection starts first and foremost with Benjamin Franklin's autobiography, one of the most famous and influential autobiographies ever written. The edition includes all the collections of his writings, together with various papers that have been published in separate pamphlets. All the writing are methodically arranged, the moral and philosophical works according to their subjects and the political papers according to their dates. 
Contents:  
Autobiography
Letters and Papers on Electricity 
Letters and Papers on Philosophical Subjects  
Papers on Subjects of General Politics 
Papers on American Subjects Before the Revolutionary Troubles  
Papers on American Subjects During the Revolutionary Troubles 
Papers, Descriptive of America, or Relating to That Country, Written Subsequent to the Revolution  
Papers on Moral Subjects and the Economy of Life 
Letters by Several Eminent Persons, Illustrative of Dr. Franklin's Manners and Character

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