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Alfred Hitchcock's Moviemaking Master Class - Learning about Film from the Master of Suspense - cover

Alfred Hitchcock's Moviemaking Master Class - Learning about Film from the Master of Suspense

Tony Lee Moral

Publisher: Michael Wiese Productions

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Summary

Alfred Hitchcock is one of the most revered filmmakers of the 20th century. Not only was he the “Master of Suspense,” he was also an innovator of storyboarding, directing, framing, editing, and marketing. Hitchcock regularly engaged with his audiences and gave lectures at film institutes, universities, and film schools across the country. Now in this Movie Making Master Class, Hitchcock author and aficionado Tony Lee Moral takes you through the process of making a ?motion picture, Hitchcock-style.

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