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There’s No Such Thing as a Bad Kid - How I Went from Stereotype to Prototype - cover

There’s No Such Thing as a Bad Kid - How I Went from Stereotype to Prototype

Titus O’Neil

Publisher: ECW Press

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Summary

An inspiring story from a humanitarian role model and WWE superstar, known to fans as Titus O’Neil
		 
One caring person can change the course of a child’s life — Titus O’Neil knows that first-hand. Growing up, he was repeatedly confronted with negativity. By the time he was a teenager, he figured that he was the bad kid everyone said he was — until an adult looked him in the eye and said, “There is no such thing as a bad kid.” Unfortunately, many children across North America are labeled “bad.” They may have short attention spans, unstable home environments, or learning difficulties. Often, these young people are diagnosed with an emotional or behavioral disorder and placed in special classes. They internalize these labels, and the imposed limitations affect their ability to learn, behave, and fit in. 
		 
There’s No Such Thing as a Bad Kid chronicles Titus’s turbulent childhood years as he was helped to shed the label and realize his unique greatness, his value and potential. His remarkable story will provide hope and inspiration to children in similar circumstances and will help guide well-meaning adults in how to pay forward their successes to a generation of disadvantaged children.

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