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Coroner - cover

Coroner

Thomas T. Noguchi, Joseph DiMona

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

America’s most controversial medical examiner explores the unanswered questions surrounding the deaths of Marilyn Monroe, Robert F. Kennedy, Sharon Tate, Janis Joplin, William Holden, Natalie Wood, John Belushi, and many of his other important casesNow, for the first time, Dr. Noguchi recounts his colorful and stormy career, explains his innovative techniques, and reveals the full story behind his most fascinating investigations.In Coroner, Dr. Noguchi sheds new light on his most controversial cases—controversies that persist even today:—How did Natalie Wood spend the last terrifying moments of her life?—Did Marilyn Monroe commit suicide or were the drugs that killed her injected into her body by someone else?—Did Sirhan Sirhan or another gunman fire the bullet that killed Robert Kennedy?—How could the knives used in the murder of Sharon Tate be identified and traced to the Manson gang if they were never found?—What were the real circumstances behind the drug-related death of Janis Joplin?—Were Patty Hearst’s kidnappers victims of police brutality or of their own revolutionary zeal?—How and why did William Holden die?—Was John Belushi murdered?These are just some of the questions answered in this powerful, gutsy book written by the real-life “Quincy,” with co-author Joseph DiMona.

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