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Notes on the State of Virginia - A Compilation of Data About the State's Natural Resources Economy and the Nature of the Good Society - cover

Notes on the State of Virginia - A Compilation of Data About the State's Natural Resources Economy and the Nature of the Good Society

Thomas Paine

Publisher: Madison & Adams Press

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Summary

"Notes on the State of Virginia" is the only full-length book which Jefferson published during his lifetime. Widely considered the most important American book published before 1800, this book is both a compilation of data by Jefferson about the state's natural resources and economy, and his vigorous argument about the nature of the good society, which he believed was incarnated by Virginia.
Contents: 
An Exact Description of the Limits and Boundaries of the State of Virginia
A Notice of the Rivers, Rivulets, and How Far They Are Navigable
A Notice of the Best Seaports of the State, and How Big Are the Vessels They Can Receive
A Notice of Its Mountains
Its Cascades and Caverns
A Notice of the Mines and Other Subterraneous Riches; Its Trees, Plants, Fruits, &c.
A Notice of All That Can Increase the Progress of Human Knowledge
The Number of Its Inhabitants
The Number and Condition of the Militia and Regular Troops, and Their Pay
The Marine
A Description of the Indians Established in That State
A Notice of the Counties, Cities, Townships and Villages
The Constitution of the State, and Its Several Charters
The Administration of Justice and the Description of the Laws
The Colleges and Public Establishments, the Roads, Buildings, &c.
The Measures Taken With Regard to the Estates and Possessions of the Rebels, Commonly Called Tories
The Different Religions Received Into That State
The Particular Customs and Manners That May Happen to Be Received in That State
The Present State of Manufactures, Commerce, Interior and Exterior Trade
The Public Income and Expenses
The Histories of the State, the Memorials Published in Its Name in the Time of Its Being a Colony, and the Pamphlets Relating to Its Interior or Exterior Affairs, Present or Ancient

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