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Christmas and Poems on Slavery for Christmas - cover

Christmas and Poems on Slavery for Christmas

Thomas Hill

Publisher: Booklassic

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Summary

A set of Christmas and antislavery poems published by Thomas Hill (1818-1891) for the Boston antislavery fair. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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